Unknown disease on Angel fish scales

BBfishes

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My coi Angel fish has a milky clear film on one side of its body I just noticed because the other angels were pecking at him like they do when one is sick and doing. But I don’t know what the plea on him is or how to treat it. Anyone have ideas? I posted a picture below to try and help diagnose it. Is hard to see but you can see a white part clomped on his skin.
 

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Colin_T

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The fish is covered in excess mucous caused by something in the water irritating the fish.

Test the water for ammonia, nitrite, nitrate and pH.

Do a 75% water change and gravel clean the substrate every day for a week.
Make sure any new water is free of chlorine/ chloramine before it's added to the tank.

If it doesn't improve after a couple of water changes, post more pictures.
 

AmyKieran

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The fish is covered in excess mucous caused by something in the water irritating the fish.

Test the water for ammonia, nitrite, nitrate and pH.

Do a 75% water change and gravel clean the substrate every day for a week.
Make sure any new water is free of chlorine/ chloramine before it's added to the tank.

If it doesn't improve after a couple of water changes, post more pictures.

I’m not attempting to offend but I’m noticing a pattern and just had a question based on your responses to posts.

Am I right in saying that basically if anything is wrong with your fish whatsoever that it’s almost always a good idea to do a 75% water change + gravel vacuum daily for 7 days?
 

Colin_T

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I’m not attempting to offend but I’m noticing a pattern and just had a question based on your responses to posts.

Am I right in saying that basically if anything is wrong with your fish whatsoever that it’s almost always a good idea to do a 75% water change + gravel vacuum daily for 7 days?
For most things, yes, but it doesn't always have to be for a week. Normally I put "do a 75% water change and gravel clean every day for a week or until the problem is identified". If we can figure out what the problem is straight away, and it isn't water quality related, then one or two water changes are fine. But sometimes it takes a few days for people to post images and relevant information about the tank, and in these situations, doing daily water changes and gravel cleans gives them something to do and can help the fish by diluting whatever bad things are in the tank.

The big daily water changes and gravel cleaning dilute any ammonia, nitrite, nitrate or other poisons that might be in the water, as well as diluting disease organisms that might be growing in large numbers. This buys you time to find out exactly what is wrong with the fish and then treat it accordingly. The cleaner environment then helps the fish recover quicker. If you need to use medications, they work best in clean tanks with no rotting fish waste or biofilm on anything.

Doing water changes and cleaning the tank and filter gives the fish keeper something to do while they try to find out what is going on. This lets them do something constructive rather than just fret about the fish being sick. It's a practical thing to do that helps the fish and alleviates the stress in the fish keeper. It's a bit like the doctor telling you to go boil some water while they are attending to the woman who is about to give birth in the bedroom. It gives you something to do.

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Over half the problems people have with fish are caused by poor water quality. So doing a big daily water change and gravel clean can help those people straight away and one water change can sometimes fix the issue if it's something like an ammonia, nitrite or nitrate reading. Even if the problem is fixed after one water change, it's still a good idea to do a few more water changes in quick succession (once a day for a few days) to make sure everything is good.

If there is a disease involved, the big daily water changes and gravel cleaning will dilute the number of pathogens in the water. This means there are fewer organisms to infect the fish and make them sick, and the fish can often live longer with the disease because there are fewer things infecting them.

The same deal with cleaning the filter if it hasn't been done in the last 2 weeks. It removes gunk that grows harmful disease organisms. The fewer disease organisms in the tank, the easier it is for the fish to fight off the disease. Some diseases can't be fought off easily and need medication or salt. A clean tank and filter allows salt and medications to work more effectively.

So yes, basic first aid for fish should include cleaning the tank up and doing big daily water changes and gravel cleans until the problem is identified.

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Increasing aeration also helps by maximising the oxygen levels in the water and making it easier for the sick fish to breath. This is akin to people being put on oxygen when having problems breathing. Clean water, a clean tank, and a clean filter will have more oxygen than a dirty tank and filter because there are fewer bacteria and other microbes using the oxygen. This leaves more oxygen for the fish.

This is a sticky at the start of the Emergency section of the forum and it's hoped people read it if they get a sick fish.
 

AmyKieran

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For most things, yes, but it doesn't always have to be for a week. Normally I put "do a 75% water change and gravel clean every day for a week or until the problem is identified". If we can figure out what the problem is straight away, and it isn't water quality related, then one or two water changes are fine. But sometimes it takes a few days for people to post images and relevant information about the tank, and in these situations, doing daily water changes and gravel cleans gives them something to do and can help the fish by diluting whatever bad things are in the tank.

The big daily water changes and gravel cleaning dilute any ammonia, nitrite, nitrate or other poisons that might be in the water, as well as diluting disease organisms that might be growing in large numbers. This buys you time to find out exactly what is wrong with the fish and then treat it accordingly. The cleaner environment then helps the fish recover quicker. If you need to use medications, they work best in clean tanks with no rotting fish waste or biofilm on anything.

Doing water changes and cleaning the tank and filter gives the fish keeper something to do while they try to find out what is going on. This lets them do something constructive rather than just fret about the fish being sick. It's a practical thing to do that helps the fish and alleviates the stress in the fish keeper. It's a bit like the doctor telling you to go boil some water while they are attending to the woman who is about to give birth in the bedroom. It gives you something to do.

-------------------
Over half the problems people have with fish are caused by poor water quality. So doing a big daily water change and gravel clean can help those people straight away and one water change can sometimes fix the issue if it's something like an ammonia, nitrite or nitrate reading. Even if the problem is fixed after one water change, it's still a good idea to do a few more water changes in quick succession (once a day for a few days) to make sure everything is good.

If there is a disease involved, the big daily water changes and gravel cleaning will dilute the number of pathogens in the water. This means there are fewer organisms to infect the fish and make them sick, and the fish can often live longer with the disease because there are fewer things infecting them.

The same deal with cleaning the filter if it hasn't been done in the last 2 weeks. It removes gunk that grows harmful disease organisms. The fewer disease organisms in the tank, the easier it is for the fish to fight off the disease. Some diseases can't be fought off easily and need medication or salt. A clean tank and filter allows salt and medications to work more effectively.

So yes, basic first aid for fish should include cleaning the tank up and doing big daily water changes and gravel cleans until the problem is identified.

-------------------
Increasing aeration also helps by maximising the oxygen levels in the water and making it easier for the sick fish to breath. This is akin to people being put on oxygen when having problems breathing. Clean water, a clean tank, and a clean filter will have more oxygen than a dirty tank and filter because there are fewer bacteria and other microbes using the oxygen. This leaves more oxygen for the fish.

This is a sticky at the start of the Emergency section of the forum and it's hoped people read it if they get a sick fish.
That was a very informative answer thankyou :) I’m actually going to save this answer for the future
 

GaryE

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There is a chance there is a parasite on the skin. I agree with Colin's view that when in doubt, change water. if I see a fish behaving strangely in a way that appears to be distress, the water changing gear is out right away. Never give a problem the advantage.

I would make sure I had some methelyne blue on hand, as it is effective for knocking off most of the tiny swimming parasites out there. Malachite green and formalin is heavier duty, but might also work if the problem doesn't clear up.

It's an angel, so there is also the possibility the attacks won't stop, if the social dynamics have turned against it. Angelfish are a major incentive for people moving into multiple tank set ups. Their social life can be nasty.

Wonderful answer there, @Colin_T .
 
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BBfishes

BBfishes

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I had done two water changes. In a few days to get rid of this green hue my tank has gotten the last week. I lost one Angel a few days ago. It started swimming strange. Now this one has that mucus. Would it be a good idea Trying to wipe the mucus off the fish in a seperate containers? Also I used micro-lift herbtana before all this started because I thought the Angel in the picture had ick. Then all this started happening. I only did two doses with 10% water changes.
 

Colin_T

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Would it be a good idea Trying to wipe the mucus off the fish in a seperate containers?
Definitely not. The stress associated with catching the fish, handling it and wiping the mucous off could harm or kill it. Do not handle sick fish.

The mucous could be from the Herbtana if you overdosed. This is a possible cause of the excess mucous and seems to coincide with you starting the medication.

Do a big water change and see what happens.

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WHITE SPOT
If you ever have to treat white spot (Ichthyophthirius), just raise the water temperature to 30C (86F) and keep it there for 2 weeks, or at least 1 week after all the white dots have gone. No medications needed, just heat.

If you use medications, salt or heat in an aquarium, increase aeration/ surface turbulence to maximise oxygen levels. Most medications, salt and warm water hold less oxygen so extra aeration is essential to keep the oxygen levels high.

The following link has information about white spot and how to treat it. Post #1 and post #16 are worth a read.
 

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