sand mud fertalizer

didz04

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Hi i am looking into these. What would you suggest will be a good one to go for please and brand wise? I'm changing from gravel to sand and wanted to add some fertilizer underneath the sand. I have seen some gravel type fertilizer i thought will be best as when i syphon the sand don't want it to agitate fertalizer underneath. Can the mud type be messy?

Thanks
 

PheonixKingZ

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I would recommend you look into some root tabs or liquid fertilizers, instead of getting mud to go under sand.
 
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didz04

didz04

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I would recommend you look into some root tabs or liquid fertilizers, instead of getting mud to go under sand.
Thanks for the reply. I read on another thread that they release ammonia if i read correctly, which did concern me. Are they not very good these products? I do have some tablet plant fertilizers. If its not worth going through mud fertilizers route i can carry on with tab form. I thought while i'm changing gravel to sand it'll be a good idea.

Thanks
 

Essjay

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It depends on the brand of root tabs. We had a member who used a cheap root tab which killed the shrimps in the tank, for example. Seachem Flourish root tabs are known not to release anything into the water column.
 

PheonixKingZ

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Thanks for the reply. I read on another thread that they release ammonia if i read correctly, which did concern me. Are they not very good these products? I do have some tablet plant fertilizers. If its not worth going through mud fertilizers route i can carry on with tab form. I thought while i'm changing gravel to sand it'll be a good idea.

Thanks
What plants do you plan to keep?
 

Byron

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As mentioned by others here, if you were intending a high-tech basically aquatic plant (with few or no fish) aquarium, involving mega light, diffused CO2, and daily nutrient dosing, then maybe one of these "plant" enriched substrates might benefit, or it might not, frankly. But if you intend a fish tank that has healthy plants included, they are a total waste of money, and in many cases they can have fish-related negative consequences.

Plants will grow well in inert sand, which is probably the best substrate. Some fish (cories for example) must have sand, so this substrate provides the most options overall. It is easy enough to use quality substrate tab fertilizers for plants needing these, or liquid comprehensive supplement fertilizers, or both--it depends upon the light, the plant species and numbers, and the fish load.

As you intend changing to sand, be aware not all sand is the same, and many types are not fish-safe, depending upon the fish and the sand.
 
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didz04

didz04

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It depends on the brand of root tabs. We had a member who used a cheap root tab which killed the shrimps in the tank, for example. Seachem Flourish root tabs are known not to release anything into the water column.
Thanks i'll look into that one.
I'm not sure how to upload pics through phone yet, but the tab i have, on the ingredients it says it has 0.025% copper which i was surprised. I don't have shrimp in my tank but i do have lots of snails. I won't be using these tabs anymore.
 
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didz04

didz04

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As mentioned by others here, if you were intending a high-tech basically aquatic plant (with few or no fish) aquarium, involving mega light, diffused CO2, and daily nutrient dosing, then maybe one of these "plant" enriched substrates might benefit, or it might not, frankly. But if you intend a fish tank that has healthy plants included, they are a total waste of money, and in many cases they can have fish-related negative consequences.

Plants will grow well in inert sand, which is probably the best substrate. Some fish (cories for example) must have sand, so this substrate provides the most options overall. It is easy enough to use quality substrate tab fertilizers for plants needing these, or liquid comprehensive supplement fertilizers, or both--it depends upon the light, the plant species and numbers, and the fish load.

As you intend changing to sand, be aware not all sand is the same, and many types are not fish-safe, depending upon the fish and the sand.
Thanks for this. I'm going to leave out the idea of mud fertilizer.
As long as it says aquarium sand, is it okay? I'm looking for one that doesn't raise the ph.
 

Byron

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Thanks for this. I'm going to leave out the idea of mud fertilizer.
As long as it says aquarium sand, is it okay? I'm looking for one that doesn't raise the ph.
An inert sand, just the same as an inert gravel, is non-calcareous. Rock such as limestone, marble, dolomite, or aragonite is calcareous, meaning it contains calcium and magnesium. When this type of rock comes into contact with water, it slowly dissolves the minerals into the water, making it hard. The GH, KH and pH will increase. Some aquarium sands (and gravels) are deliberately made from calcareous rock, but there are others that are inert. Read the package carefully.

That is only one issue, however. The fish you intend keeping have to be considered. Substrate fish, meaning most catfish, but also some upper fish like cichlids, may have issues with the substrate material, depending upon what it is and their natural feeding habits and how they interact with the substrate. Aquarium Sand that is inert should be OK, especially if it says "aquarium river sand." Industrial sands is where the trouble really exists, and these are best avoided, though as with everything there are a few exceptions.
 
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didz04

didz04

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An inert sand, just the same as an inert gravel, is non-calcareous. Rock such as limestone, marble, dolomite, or aragonite is calcareous, meaning it contains calcium and magnesium. When this type of rock comes into contact with water, it slowly dissolves the minerals into the water, making it hard. The GH, KH and pH will increase. Some aquarium sands (and gravels) are deliberately made from calcareous rock, but there are others that are inert. Read the package carefully.

That is only one issue, however. The fish you intend keeping have to be considered. Substrate fish, meaning most catfish, but also some upper fish like cichlids, may have issues with the substrate material, depending upon what it is and their natural feeding habits and how they interact with the substrate. Aquarium Sand that is inert should be OK, especially if it says "aquarium river sand." Industrial sands is where the trouble really exists, and these are best avoided, though as with everything there are a few exceptions.
Thanks, i'll find the one i like post it to check if its okay. I'm trying to find finest and softest sand.

I've seen that you've mentioned about play sand in another thread, if i've seen correctly. Would any play sand be fine? Is that the softest sand we can get?
 

Byron

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Thanks, i'll find the one i like post it to check if its okay. I'm trying to find finest and softest sand.

I've seen that you've mentioned about play sand in another thread, if i've seen correctly. Would any play sand be fine? Is that the softest sand we can get?

Good idea to post a link if you find a sand you might be interested in.

Play Sand. No, all "play" sand is not alike. In North America there is an industrial brand of sand called Quikrete; they produce several types of industrial sand, including the Quikrete Play Sand. I use this, as do others, and it is about as safe as any sand can be for fish.

As you are in the UK, Quikrete is not available, but there is another brand that UK members agree is good, I will leave it to them (@Essjay knows) to name as I don't want to get it wrong.
 

Essjay

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The one we use in the UK is Argos play sand. Many members use this so we know it is fish safe.
 

Fishfinder1973

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I had the mud under substrate.
It was great for plants,but eventually it leached ammonia and caused unbelievable problems.
Mud for aquascaping.
gravel/sand for fish.
 

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