Pictus Catfish

jimwg

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I just got a pictus catfish for my 75 gallon community tank. I've never kept one before butI thought I needed a bottom dweller as I had none. So far s/he hides a lot, bolting out for flakes and blood worms then back behind the plastic plant.
 

Sgooosh

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I just got a pictus catfish for my 75 gallon community tank. I've never kept one before butI thought I needed a bottom dweller as I had none. So far s/he hides a lot, bolting out for flakes and blood worms then back behind the plastic plant.
pretty sure that is normal behavior for catfish, they like the dark
 

itiwhetu

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Pictus are fine by themselves. What else is in the tank?. They like to go hunting at night so be careful that none of his tank mates are bite size.
 

Ichthys

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Pictus are fine by themselves. What else is in the tank?. They like to go hunting at night so be careful that none of his tank mates are bite size.
Keeping fish singly that need a group of their own species in order to be stress-free is not “fine”. If we started advising everyone to keep neons and cories etc on their own we wouldn’t get very far. Pictus are no different. They’ll survive on their own, but the responsible ones among us keep them properly.
 
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Byron

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Compatibility/Temperament: Peaceful but it is predatory and as it matures it will eat small fish. Should be kept in a small group of at least 5; single fish may pine away. Tankmates should not include sedate fish like angels, discus, gourami and even cichlids as these will be pestered by the nocturnal habits of this catfish, nor nippy fish like barbs. Medium-sized characins, larger rasbora, rainbowfish are suitable.

This striking catfish should only be kept in a group of 5 minimum (more if space permits); when kept singly the fish is frequently less active and more prone to stress-related health issues. The aquarium requires at least a moderate flow from the filter to provide a current; plenty of swimming space is needed, as this is a very active fish. Fine gravel or sand substrate with some rounded rocks and bogwood or branches providing hiding places will replicate this fish's habitat. Naturally nocturnal and more active during darkness, very dim lighting will result in this fish being more active and it will feed during the day; new fish may require feeding in the evening after the light is out, and frozen bloodworms are an excellent initial inducement to eat but goinf forward bloodworms should not be fed more than once a week. Given the low light, hardy plants like Anubias and Java Fern would be suitable. Plants plus weekly partial water changes will help to maintain very good water conditions; otherwise barbel loss may occur.

Sedate upper fish will be stressed by the nocturnal habits of this fish.
 

itiwhetu

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I have only ever kept Pictus by themselves. Before I posted into this thread I did a google search and google said they are fine by themselves as well. But it looks like I am wrong again, you need to go out and grab half a dozen or more just to be on the safe side.
 

Ichthys

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Google doesn’t know how to keep fish. You’ll get both answers there. Go to one (or preferably some) of the sites that know what they’re doing for right answers. :)
 

Ichthys

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@jimwg get a few more and you’ll see natural behaviour rather than hiding all the time. They will eat small fish though, like neons and smaller.
 
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Byron

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How many times must the obvious be pointed out...doing searches is fine, but you absolutely must know the site you go to is accurate and reliable, and that means, who owns/runs it. One site is Seriously Fish

and it recommends:
Peaceful enough but bear in mind this is a predatory species. Unfortunately it’s often sold as a bottom dweller for the community of smaller fish, a situation which must have led to the deaths of countless neons, guppies and similarly-sized species. It’s really only suitable for roomy tanks with occupants that can’t be swallowed. It can also bother slower-moving tankmates (such as many cichlids) with its activity levels and long barbels, especially at night or when feeding. Robust, active species therefore make the best tankmates. Rainbowfish, medium to large-sized characins, cyprinids and tough catfish such as Loricariids or Doradids are all suitable.​
Although a single specimen will survive by itself, it’s a shoaling species by nature and will be much more outgoing and active when maintained in a group of six or more. If kept alone it tends to remain hidden during daylight hours, emerging only after lights out.​

Any knowledgeable site will say much the same; those sources online that do not are best ignored since they clearly have little understanding or knowledge of the species.
 

itiwhetu

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How many times must the obvious be pointed out...doing searches is fine, but you absolutely must know the site you go to is accurate and reliable, and that means, who owns/runs it. One site is Seriously Fish

and it recommends:
Peaceful enough but bear in mind this is a predatory species. Unfortunately it’s often sold as a bottom dweller for the community of smaller fish, a situation which must have led to the deaths of countless neons, guppies and similarly-sized species. It’s really only suitable for roomy tanks with occupants that can’t be swallowed. It can also bother slower-moving tankmates (such as many cichlids) with its activity levels and long barbels, especially at night or when feeding. Robust, active species therefore make the best tankmates. Rainbowfish, medium to large-sized characins, cyprinids and tough catfish such as Loricariids or Doradids are all suitable.​
Although a single specimen will survive by itself, it’s a shoaling species by nature and will be much more outgoing and active when maintained in a group of six or more. If kept alone it tends to remain hidden during daylight hours, emerging only after lights out.​

Any knowledgeable site will say much the same; those sources online that do not are best ignored since they clearly have little understanding or knowledge of the species.
Like I said you have kept these fish in schools so you are best to advise. And it has been stated google doesn't keep fish, we do.
 

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