rhyssutherland2002

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Consider all as group of 6
are gold tetras as nippy as Silvertip ?
Are bloodfin tetras nippy?
I know all tetras can be nippy kept in small numbers, however I'm talking about in general.

Are black line tail tetra anymore nippy than any other?
Are they as nippy as silvertips?
 
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GaryE

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Yes, and yes. In small tanks in small groups, they will bug their slower tankmates. As always, in big tanks with flowing water, the problem's probably solved.
 

Byron

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Agree with @GaryE. There is scientific evidence that in groups less than ten, shoaling fish are stressed, and this has ramifications. Aggression is increased--fish normally peaceful become somewhat aggressive, and naturally aggressive fish get much more aggressive. Also, fish in smaller groups than ten showed a latency to eat; when fish are slow to eat food offered, it is a certain indicator that something is wrong, as feeding is a basic instinct to survive in order to reproduce and maintain the species. Smaller groups also had more significant fear responses to perceived threats (noises, etc).

Similar symptoms can occur when the fish are in too small a space, so this has to be factored in along with the number of the species.
 
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rhyssutherland2002

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Agree with @GaryE. There is scientific evidence that in groups less than ten, shoaling fish are stressed, and this has ramifications. Aggression is increased--fish normally peaceful become somewhat aggressive, and naturally aggressive fish get much more aggressive. Also, fish in smaller groups than ten showed a latency to eat; when fish are slow to eat food offered, it is a certain indicator that something is wrong, as feeding is a basic instinct to survive in order to reproduce and maintain the species. Smaller groups also had more significant fear responses to perceived threats (noises, etc).

Similar symptoms can occur when the fish are in too small a space, so this has to be factored in along with the number of the species.
Are the black line tetra as nippy as others such as silvertips.
In community tank conditions.
 

Essjay

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I have never heard of black line tetras, it must be a common name local to you. Can you give us the latin name so we know which fish you mean.

Edit - google suggests Moenkhausia costae and Hyphessobrycon scholzei - is it one of those?

 
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rhyssutherland2002

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I have never heard of black line tetras, it must be a common name local to you. Can you give us the latin name so we know which fish you mean.

Edit - google suggests Moenkhausia costae and Hyphessobrycon scholzei - is it one of those?

Yes it's the Moenkhausia costae
 

Byron

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Moenkhausia costae was described by Steindachner in 1907, as Tetragonopterus costae, and it was at the beginning of the present century that ichthyologists agreed it is actually in the genus Moenkhausia. For whatever reason, it has not been seen all that much. There is no record of the species on Seriously Fish. However, I am quite familiar with two other species assigned to this genus, having kept and spawned Moenkhausis pittieri ("Diamond" Tetra) and M. sanctaefilomenia (various common names). Both can get a tad nippy, though not to the extent of fish like the Tiger Barb, but it is worth the caution.

This is one of the advantages of using the scientific name. Species in the same genus are much more likely to share a number of common traits and behaviours. I would consider this species to be much like Silvertips in this regard, so beware.

I just spotted bloodfins mentioned earlier...the species in this genus, Aphyocharax, are notorious for fin nipping. One of them, A. paraguayensis, not a "bloodfin" but a species in the same genus, is one of the most aggressive very small fish in the hobby. I once added a group of 15 to a heavily planted 90g tank and within two days of adding them, every other fish in the tank was quivering behind the plants and would not even come out to feed. The A. paraguayensis quickly came out of this tank believe me; I don't tolerate any fish terrorizing the other inhabitants in an aquarium. None of the "bloodfins" are good community fish.
 

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