My System No Dechlorinator

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itiwhetu

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It is time to put up this thread. Other Threads have been talking about old School systems and implying, we didn't know what we were doing.

My system for water changing:

It relies on the tank to be Heavily planted around 50%, acid water, natural neutral base. Good filtration.
Then it is possible to safely do 25% water changes using no Dechlorinator, this works for town supply water that has Chlorine in it.
When refilling the tank you bring the garden hose in and fill the tank with the spray nozzle. The tank water will drop 3-4 degrees which is not a problem for the fish.

As the water hits the tank almost all the Chlorine is dissipated into the atmosphere the little bit remaining is absorbed by the system.

I have been using this system for water changing for over 40 years.
 

Rocky998

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Thats super cool... Except my hose wont reach my aquarium and I don't want to drag it through the house lol.
 

Ch4rlie

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Does it not take around 24 hours for chlorine to completely evaporate?

Chlorine does not dissipate or evaporate that quickly imo, I may be thinking that the surrounding air condition especially if warmer may help the chlorine to dissipate quicker but not completely within the short time you say.

I am no scientist at all but that is what logic tells me anyway.
 
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itiwhetu

itiwhetu

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Does it not take around 24 hours for chlorine to completely evaporate?

Chlorine does not dissipate or evaporate that quickly imo, I may be thinking that the surrounding air condition especially if warmer may help the chlorine to dissipate quicker but not completely within the short time you say.

I am no scientist at all but that is what logic tells me anyway.
Chlorine sits in water as an inert gas, so dissipates almost immediately with agitation
 
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itiwhetu

itiwhetu

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When you have an tank with no plants like the one below. The method is to use a passive under gravel filter and two power full mechanical filters. Use 4mm gravel as the base. The whole base of the tank becomes a biological filter and then allows the tank to be water changed using the same method but also hold a large number of fish
022.JPG
 

JennySolano

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It is time to put up this thread. Other Threads have been talking about old School systems and implying, we didn't know what we were doing.

My system for water changing:

It relies on the tank to be Heavily planted around 50%, acid water, natural neutral base. Good filtration.
Then it is possible to safely do 25% water changes using no Dechlorinator, this works for town supply water that has Chlorine in it.
When refilling the tank you bring the garden hose in and fill the tank with the spray nozzle. The tank water will drop 3-4 degrees which is not a problem for the fish.

As the water hits the tank almost all the Chlorine is dissipated into the atmosphere the little bit remaining is absorbed by the system.

I have been using this system for water changing for over 40 years.
You’re saying the spray dissipates the Cl?

Have you been able to test the Cl level?
 

Ch4rlie

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Am sorry but I find that almost impossible to believe that chlorine dissipates so quickly with agitation.

I thought chlorine, yes it’s a gas but it takes time for this to go off, fastest method is simply boiling the water is what I know but not dissipating straight from the tap.

Sorry for all the questions but interesting.
Do you happen to have any scientific links proving this, would be an interesting read, well for me anyway if I can decipher the science jargon :lol:
 
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itiwhetu

itiwhetu

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Am sorry but I find that almost impossible to believe that chlorine dissipates so quickly with agitation.

I thought chlorine, yes it’s a gas but it takes time for this to go off, fastest method is simply boiling the water is what I know but not dissipating straight from the tap.

Sorry for all the questions but interesting.
Do you happen to have any scientific links proving this, would be an interesting read, well for me anyway if I can decipher the science jargon :lol:
This method was taught to me by a Professor of Zoology. I have never needed to test if it works. Because it does. I don't have links to scientific papers don't need them.
 

Bruce Leyland-Jones

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Does it not take around 24 hours for chlorine to completely evaporate?

Chlorine does not dissipate or evaporate that quickly imo, I may be thinking that the surrounding air condition especially if warmer may help the chlorine to dissipate quicker but not completely within the short time you say.

I am no scientist at all but that is what logic tells me anyway.
In theory, the chlorine in my water would actually dissipate when it's pouring, at force, into the bucket.
I'm just overly cautious in preserving my beneficial bacteria, that I've taken so long to carefully cultivate, so I use a water conditioner.
Doing so, takes a very low risk to no risk at all.
 
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itiwhetu

itiwhetu

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In theory, the chlorine in my water would actually dissipate when it's pouring, at force, into the bucket.
I'm just overly cautious in preserving my beneficial bacteria, that I've taken so long to carefully cultivate, so I use a water conditioner.
Doing so, takes a very low risk to no risk at all.
What the aquarium world has done is moved away from gravel and now vacuum the base they have. Therefore removing bacteria all the time. I have never vacuumed a tank and I have never used sand. I look at the base of my tank as part of the filtration system.
 

Bruce Leyland-Jones

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What the aquarium world has done is moved away from gravel and now vacuum the base they have. Therefore removing bacteria all the time. I have never vacuumed a tank and I have never used sand. I look at the base of my tank as part of the filtration system.
To be honest, because of the care I took in laying my substrate, any waste waste finds it's way downhill to just two handy spots, where I can then suck it out of the tank. I'm yet to vacuum the rest of the substrate in either of my tanks.
 

Ch4rlie

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This method was taught to me by a Professor of Zoology. I have never needed to test if it works. Because it does. I don't have links to scientific papers don't need them.

You may not need the scientific papers, but I do.

I can’t seem to find anything conclusive online about chlorine or chloramine disappearing so quickly without boiling water or letting it gas off over a period of time.

So therefore I can’t just take your word on this, whether you were told this by a professor or not is beside the point, you may well be right and have a point but I need to have something a bit more conclusive.
 
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