My Bird House

emeraldking

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I love it...!
I'm a bird lover as well. I had a bird house (self made) in the backyard for years. Used to keep and breed several kinds of parakeets, finches, small kinds of parrots, diamond doves and weavers.
Nowadays we only keep a meyers parrot called Rocco.
 

jaylach

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I LOVE hook bills! I can't match your room but my cockatiel seems to like his penthouse. :)
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Aqua67

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I LOVE hook bills! I can't match your room but my cockatiel seems to like his penthouse. :)
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Must say that is one gorgeous cage and one very lucky bird. You know there’s definitely room for another cockatiel in that cage. But be careful that’s how it all starts. Birds can be like fish tanks. There is that old saying… “Oh, what’s one more?!”…😊
 

emeraldking

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Must say that is one gorgeous cage and one very lucky bird. You know there’s definitely room for another cockatiel in that cage. But be careful that’s how it all starts. Birds can be like fish tanks. There is that old saying… “Oh, what’s one more?!”…😊
Our parrot does not like other birds. Not even of her own kind. That's why we've only have one parrot.
 
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Aqua67

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My cockatiel is sort of a rescue bird and VERY territorial about his cage to the point where he will attack a mirror. I'm a bit afraid to put in another bird.
You are right, there is no guarantee that the birds will get along and any time a new bird is adopted you must assume they will need their own cage.

As far as cage aggression, that usually happens when a bird is never let out of its cage. Some species are more prone to that also, generally speaking, such as quaker parrots.

There is truly such a thing as parrot psychology. For birds with cage aggression, just open the door to their cage and let them come out on their own. Usually, once they are out of the cage (sitting atop the door, sitting atop the cage) they will be more cooperative to step up onto a perch or your finger, etc. However, if the bird is fully flighted it may still be sassy and the reason is it knows it doesn’t need you to get from point A to point B. It can fly where ever it wants to go without your assistance. It knows it doesn’t have to cooperate to get where it wants to go. Clipping flight feathers can also clip the attitude, so to speak.

One of the birds that was dropped off at my house when the public thought I was a bird rescue (local newspaper did a story on me), he had a mirror in his cage. This bird loved his reflection in the mirror. He was a normal grey male cockatiel. I also had a normal grey male cockatiel of my own and when they met, the new bird was smitten with my bird. He would follow him around and hop, holding his wings in a heart shape when viewed from behind (courting behaviors). My poor male bird would peck at the new bird to try and get him to knock it off. My bird liked the ladies and this new male rescue was cramping his style. LOL. Birds are very social creatures and sitting for hours and watching their flock behaviors was like a front row seat at a soap opera.
 

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