MD Aquascaping drops the use of Co2. Still has fine looking plants.

Bruce Leyland-Jones

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BLJ,I have those..red Ancistrus,2 Panda Garra's..but they need more that algae. Getting food to them has taken some training for them to compete with the Rainbows. But they did learn and jump on the beefheart or shredded shrimp like a fumble in the Super Bowl!
In one tank, I have very active Bristlenose and snails.
In the other, I have just the one Panda Garra and a plethora of shrimp...and snails.

In both, algae wafers are very welcome, as is the occasional slice of courgette.
The Panda is also extremely fond of the shrimp pellets.
They also take tablet and frozen foods.
 

Bruce Leyland-Jones

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Because you arent set up for fast growth high tech/high lighting.

Didn't mean to imply that you can't have a tank without algae unless you use CO2 but if you are going for a hightech setup without CO2 you are going to have a bad time.
And there was me, thinking that my Fluval Aquasky 2.) Bluetooth was high tech! 😂
 

anewbie

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It depends a lot on plant species. he chose plants that are 'easy' to grow but with more difficult plants co2 really helps; having said that my low tech aquariums seem to get very little algae - in 2 1/2 years i've only cleaned the glass once or twice on both my 29s; the high tech are a lot more sensitive to things getting out of whack. To be honest the tank that did the best (lwo tech) was the one that was way over populated with live bearers (swordtails/guppies). In its hey day it probably had 3x the expected stocking. The trick was to not over feed them. Nothing like a little extra food will go a long way to killing the water.
 
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anewbie

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Because you arent set up for fast growth high tech/high lighting.

Didn't mean to imply that you can't have a tank without algae unless you use CO2 but if you are going for a hightech setup without CO2 you are going to have a bad time.
What is a 'hightech' setup without co2? co2 is the determining factor as to whether it is high-tech or low-tech with regards to plants.
 

xxBarneyxx

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What is a 'hightech' setup without co2? co2 is the determining factor as to whether it is high-tech or low-tech with regards to plants.
Is it? If you take your standard hightech, high light, high fert, CO2 tank and remove the CO2 a lot of times you are going to have issues.

If you take your standard low tech, low light, low fert tank and stick CO2 in them you aren't going to really notice a lot of difference as CO2 is probably not the limiting factor.

That's the issues with the high/low tech labels for me. There is a bunch of stuff in between the two that works.
 

Bruce Leyland-Jones

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I remember back in the mid-80s, when a West German system of planted aquariums was making headway in our local hobby.
This really did focus on cultivating the plants and the earliest models advanced the humble undergravel filter with increasingly powerful powerheads, large multi-media, external cannisters and spray bars. (Expensive) Liquid Fertilisers were becoming more accessible, as were tablets and capsules, though these were very few and far between and it was generally accepted that fish waste would provide the greenery with sufficient nutrition. Methods of adding extra CO2 were arriving and these were considered to be a step-up from the 'basic' models and there was a distinct suggestion that some aquarists involved had very little time for the fish and their whole hobby was, essentially, creating beautiful, watery gardens.
'Special' plant growth-promoting fluorescent tubes were also becoming more widely available and, because these lights also brought out some nice colours in the fish, they also became increasingly popular.

That said, this was all deemed very Hi-Tech.

Today, obviously, those older systems would be deemed relatively Lo-Tech, especially as gadgets and gizmos, (many of them actually useful), have developed.
We have access to much better lights, with all manner of spectra and timings to play with, CO2 diffusers and suchlike and even better ways of cultivating the plants, so that they arrive guaranteed to be totally pest and disease-free, (see Tropica, as an example).

Today, I'd suggest that much of the old Hi-Tech is now relatively Lo-Tech and that, sometime in the not-too distant future, more technological 'advances', (using that word guardedly ;) ), will relegate today's Hi-Tech to Lo-Tech and the stuff from the early 80s and before, will be deemed prehistoric and irrelevant by many cheeky young sweats. Todays users of Hi-Tec systems will merely be old fogeys, sucking on their Werther's Originals and those who enjoyed the old basics, would be still enjoying their tanks, following the basic principles of aquarium plant care, ensuring good light and good nutrition.

I'm now going for a nice cup of tea and a sit down. :p
 
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Stan510

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I remember all that. I think around '88 'The Optimum Aquarium' came out,a book I have. They were really pushing laterite aquarium soils. It had so much iron it was red. They also used heating wires under all that. That,not such a good idea after all. How to fix those when its covered in plants and roots?
They had Co2 pretty much like today..but the lighting was mega wattage Halide and in those days,it was not especially attractive in spectrum. Still,it could punch down to the bottom of the 2,000 gallon planted aquarium used in the book.
They admitted that the aquarium had to be redone 2 years later. The sand over the laterite had reacted and made a cement like substrate. Plus the pendant lighting that had looked like what you see at baseball fields ( for one example) were replaced by some kind of square lights..I don't remember if it was quartz or a better halide. But looked much more modern and sleek. The good old days.
 

Wills

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I'm not 100% that MD is the best example here, I get what you are saying but its pretty well known that he comes from an area in the UK with very good water straight from the taps. Its really soft and really low on any natural pollutants and theres something to do with the way the combination holds a higher than average level of Co2.

He has done a lot of work and found some great methods - his cheap LED lights for example are a bit of a revelation - but I reckon in 9/10 places if you did the exact same as him you wouldnt get the same results.

I think its worth a nod to his natural artistry too, he laughs it off a lot and plays his ability and knowledge down for the video but hes got skills that make up a good percentage of the final design.

Wills
 
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Stan510

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It sort of came to me that has he mentioned growing red plants on no Co2 and they are doing well? I know I posted the Indian gentleman who was growing red plants and no Co2 in a ten gallon..lots of light and just a half dozen Neons.
I've come to terms that Tiger Lotus and Alternanthera r. roseafolia are the only two red plants I can keep on basic lighting, some sun,and basic filtration. And the Alternanthera started out fast...now seems tired and much slower growing and is algae challenged. Common problem.
 

anewbie

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It sort of came to me that has he mentioned growing red plants on no Co2 and they are doing well? I know I posted the Indian gentleman who was growing red plants and no Co2 in a ten gallon..lots of light and just a half dozen Neons.
I've come to terms that Tiger Lotus and Alternanthera r. roseafolia are the only two red plants I can keep on basic lighting, some sun,and basic filtration. And the Alternanthera started out fast...now seems tired and much slower growing and is algae challenged. Common problem.
There are some red sword plants that will do fine without co2; also there are actually 3 critical parameters: soil composition, light and co2. There are plants that will do fine without co2 if they have a rich soil.... That is something to consider.
 

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