I just hurt my dog :-(

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AdoraBelle Dearheart

AdoraBelle Dearheart

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No, but I use to be in vet field. Love animals. Spent a great deal of my life training them and handler. They are quite some work that breed..so rewarding to work with ..that high energy is undeniable lol …I think they were voted smartest dog breed tho I forgot which year and where …my neighbors where I use to live had one but they never trained it and being that smart you know what happens when you neglect exercising that smart brain 😑…they are very active dog and requires an owner with an active lifestyle IMO..my neighbors ..they wouldn’t even walk him smh
Nice! Part of me would love to work in the veterinary field, but the other part of me would get too upset if pets weren't looked after properly, or couldn't be saved :(

Oh for sure, you're dead right about collies. They're really not for first-time dog owners, couch potatoes, or people who aren't prepared for the amount of work and time they need! Makes sense, we did breed them for hundreds of years to work all day outside with a farmer, they need a lot of stamina and motivation to spend 10-12 hours out in the fields, and smarts to herd well without getting kicked in the head. They've been consistently ranked the smartest breed (closely followed by the poodle! Oddly enough), and they dominate obedience and agility competitions for a reason :D

I love all of that, how she's so willing to train and loves to "work", but she's also incredibly sensitive... even a sharp tone in my voice would devastate her, so if she had been owned by someone who believed in the alpha/dominance stuff, or ignored her most of the time, her spirit would have been totally crushed. She can be cheeky too; I swear on like, all the gods, that she has a sense of humour! She'll repeat behaviours that she knows will make us laugh.

Aaaannnd too many people get them without knowing all the above, and don't have the time or inclination to do all those activities with them. There will be the odd lazy collie that's content to be a family dog, but I'd never bank on that! It's not even just exercise, although they need plenty of that too. But you'll never tire one out by exercise alone. You could walk them eight hours a day, and they just get fitter and fitter ;) They'll always outpace a human. I took her on a doggy holiday a couple of years ago, we'd be out for 7-8 hours at a time, running through woodland, wading in rivers, swimming in the ocean -she had a fantastic time, but she'd get back from a day like that, nap for an hour, then leap up and want to go do it all over again.

Mental work is as tiring as physical exercise though, so balancing the two is the key to happy, high energy/smart dogs being fulfilled and well behaved. So she learned all the usual obedience, plenty of tricks, nose work, agility, clicker training, puzzle games, anything new, exciting and makes her think makes her happy, and ready to relax and sleep the rest of the time! Understimulated working dogs - especially collies - are prone to obsessive or destructive behaviour, and who can blame them? They've gotta make their own entertainment if they aren't given instruction and stimulation.

Weirdly for a dog that's mostly Springer Spaniel, and can do some complex tricks -she's terrible at retrieve :lol:
 

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I second using a dremel instead. One of my dogs is absolutely horrible about having her nails trimmed, and they're all black so it's just an accident waiting to happen. I'm much more comfortable with the dremel even if it does take slightly longer to get them trimmed down.

I'm sorry that happened to you and the doggo. I feel bad when I accidentally step on my dogs, so I can only imagine how scary and upsetting that must have been. Just know your doggo has already forgiven you, and if there's a problem when it comes time for another trim, treats go a long way. Especially peanutbutter if she's anything like my dogs!
 

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when it comes time for another trim, treats go a long way. Especially peanutbutter if she's anything like my dogs!
you don't have to be a dog to love peanut butter - I go through a jar every 5 days. I could eat a whole jar of Jif creamy PB in one sitting but I know, healthwise, that wouldn't be a good idea.
 
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AdoraBelle Dearheart

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When we used to clip my dogs nails, it used to happen occasionally. I also felt bad, because I imagine it would hurt a ton.

Hope it gets better soon. :/

Thank you PK :)
It definitely makes you feel awful! I trim my parrots claws but even though they're black, I've only nipped the quick maybe 3-4 times in his life, and he's 22 years old! But those were minor and a styptic pencil stopped the bleeding immediately. I still felt bad of course, but it wasn't nearly so dramatic, and he didn't freak out after an initial protest.

The dogs have never needed their nails clipped until recently. Walking on the pavement on the way to and from local parks wore them down enough. But now my elderly dog is disabled and doesn't go on walks, his nails have got too long. I figured if I could manage the parrot, I could do the dogs, ordered a nail trimmer, watched some youtube videos on how to do it etc.

Had no problem doing the older dogs claws. Can't see the quick since both dogs have mostly black nails, but he slept right though it and I only took a little off, planning to do another tiny trim in a week or so, let the quick recede by trimming little and often. Pixie's front nails were a little long, so thought I'd do them too. I did one paw yesterday and she was a bit unsure, but did brilliantly and it was over quickly and easily, so thought I'd do the other front paw tonight... and this happened :(
I second using a dremel instead. One of my dogs is absolutely horrible about having her nails trimmed, and they're all black so it's just an accident waiting to happen. I'm much more comfortable with the dremel even if it does take slightly longer to get them trimmed down.

I'm sorry that happened to you and the doggo. I feel bad when I accidentally step on my dogs, so I can only imagine how scary and upsetting that must have been. Just know your doggo has already forgiven you, and if there's a problem when it comes time for another trim, treats go a long way. Especially peanutbutter if she's anything like my dogs!

I'll definitely think about a dremmel, I'm be so nervous about using the clipper style again after this :( and me being nervous would make the dog nervous. Your pup who doesn't like having her nails done- how does she react to the dremmel?

For now, I'll call the vets when they open, see whether she might need antibiotics and if they recommend keeping it bandaged and covered for a few days. Will get them to bandage her up if so, my wrapping skills are lacking!

Think I'm just gonna walk her on the pavements more often for now! Grind them down that way, like before. Jack also used to go a brilliant local groomer who is great with the dogs, and not expensive, so might ask her to do it this time. We'll see.
 

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Ah that’s awful! Those things just happen, I did it (though to a lesser extent than your dog’s) to one of the bunnies yesterday. I know what you mean, that it was more than just a little bit of damage. I have never heard of a styptic pencil, but my mom has a little container of styptic powder for when we clip the the dogs’ and rabbits’ nails a little too far. You can scoop a little bit up with a clean finger and pack it on there real good. You can use corn starch too, it works almost as well. I just looked up a pencil, snd while I’ve never used one, I wonder if a powder might work better with the larger amount of blood from the damage on your dog’s nail? We used to have a goldendoodle, years and years ago before they were as popular as they are now, and no matter how careful you were, her nails would bleed every single time! My mom would pack the corn starch on until the bleeding stopped.
 

itiwhetu

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I'm so sorry for your loss :( It's always devastating, and you never forget them. The pain is worth going through compared to the joy they bring over their lifetime, but it's so hard when they pass.

Do you have any dogs now?

My other dog (technically, my family's dog, but I live here now and I trained him as a pup/exercised him when I came back to take care of folks, until he became ill, so easier to just say I have two dogs when talking about them!) is 15 now, and has a lot of health issues, so his mobility is severely limited now. Needs to be carried/supported with a sling to go outside, losing bladder control, befuddled but at least not distressed or in too much pain beyond arthritis. So we're giving him palliative care at this point, until he lets us know it's time. Heart-breaking, and a lot of work, but he's worth it.

He's an English Springer/English Cocker cross.
Back in healthier times, Jack;
View attachment 142910



Haha, thank you! She's a Springer/Border Collie, so lots of working dog genes, lots of energy and smarts! She reminds me of a collie in that she's glued to me, and reads my face like a book, the way collies have that intense gaze when working with their handler, you know? Great at obedience and agility, highly sensitive to tone and body language, and whip smart as well! Not just bragging on my dog (well, a little bit) she's the smartest dog I've ever owned, so combined with the energy, she was a lot of work as a pup and younger dog! Needs lots of mental stimulation as well as exercise. Not an easy dog in the wrong hands, But I love a dog like that, so it worked out well for us :D She's nine now so the energy has mellowed a bit, but not by much ;)

Do you have collies then? :)
No I have never had another dog, one day maybe. I have a friend with a Border Terrier which I love. So I may get one of those at some stage. That photo looks so like a Munster ;)
 
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AdoraBelle Dearheart

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Ah that’s awful! Those things just happen, I did it (though to a lesser extent than your dog’s) to one of the bunnies yesterday. I know what you mean, that it was more than just a little bit of damage. I have never heard of a styptic pencil, but my mom has a little container of styptic powder for when we clip the the dogs’ and rabbits’ nails a little too far. You can scoop a little bit up with a clean finger and pack it on there real good. You can use corn starch too, it works almost as well. I just looked up a pencil, snd while I’ve never used one, I wonder if a powder might work better with the larger amount of blood from the damage on your dog’s nail? We used to have a goldendoodle, years and years ago before they were as popular as they are now, and no matter how careful you were, her nails would bleed every single time! My mom would pack the corn starch on until the bleeding stopped.

Thank you hon! While I don't want other pets to have to go through it, it does help to know I'm not alone, it does happen sometimes no matter how hard we try!

Styptic powder would have worked much better, I'm sure! I could have just dripped her whole paw in it... The styptic pencil is the same stuff, just packed tight and shaped like a piece of chalk. Worked great for pressing against the parrots tiny thin claws, but not so well on an unhappy dog and panicked owner! Was trying to hold the thing against the cut nail after wetting it, and it just got covered in blood. Had no cornstarch in the kitchen either! Have already ordered some styptic powder, just in case. Since even vets mess up sometimes and cut the quick.

Sorry to hear it happened to you too! Poor bunny. Glad it wasn't such a bad cut, hope it wasn't too traumatic for you guys and that bun bun is better now.

Poor goldendoodle too! And for both of you. You must have all dreaded claw clipping time, which only makes it worse! The downsides of pet ownership, urgh!
No I have never had another dog, one day maybe. I have a friend with a Border Terrier which I love. So I may get one of those at some stage. That photo looks so like a Munster ;)
You have good taste in dogs, lol! Border terriers are another favourite of mine, great little dogs. Look like grumpy old men, but generally sweet and smart! A lecturer at the college I went to had one, and I fell in love with the breed then. Awesome little dog, and I've always said I'll have one one day. You should totally get one. Having a dog is good for both your physical and mental health after all!

I hope the photos of Pixie bought back good memories of Zoe. :)
 

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You're not the first to do that and you won't be the last. Dogs also seem to be able to forgive humans alot easier for hurting them too, they sense that it was not meant and they will try very hard to comfort you when you are trying to comfort them whilst feeling guilty...that's how many animals are, far more forgiving natures than humans sometimes.

With my dogs, both my own, those that had been rescued from abusive owners and those I was making assessments of or retraining, I would take to the vet for a monthly once over...sometimes turned up at the vets with 6 or more of them at once....they would have their general health checked, have any injuries checked/treated and have their teeth cleaned and nails clipped. The more nervy dogs would be sedated slightly, made it easier on them (and easier on the vet tech having a dog that was nervy to be more relaxed). Obviously little accidents still happened, it is inevitable sometimes....even sedated dogs can get twitchy around their feet being handled (my GSD, Sam, was a terror for having massively ticklish feet, even when sedated....so resorted to daily 10 mile walks every day which did the trick on his nails)

What you need to remember from now on is not to be nervy about doing the nails in future, dogs - like all animals - know when their human is nervous and that transmits to the animal. Be assertive to the dog, do not show nerves or fear and the dog will be relaxed with you again when sorting the nails....or as you already mentioned, a visit to the groomer or vet to do them in future is ideal if you feel too nervy to do them again yourself.
 

Avel1896

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Hey !
Breathe in................. breathe out.............. again............... repeat..................
Stop stressing out 😌
This is absolutely NOT serious at all.
Next time use hydrogen peroxide or.......... a rough nailfile ;)
 

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Years ago, I used to work in dog kennels and for a charity kennels, Hearing Dogs, and was responsible for dogs wellbeing such as grooming, taking to vets, assessing temperaments etc etc and of course clipping nails to name but a few things.

Clipping nails was not one of my favourite parts of the job but has to be done especially if owners don't walk dogs on hard ground like pavements and road which naturally grinds nails to a manageable point.

Anyway, I digress, I once made the mistake of trimming one of our dogs (a cute little white terrier cross) nail way too short and was mortified I did this and wrapped her paw in a towel, carried her under my arm and went to my supervisor to ask what I should do, she said don't worry, it happens and simply showed me how to apply styptic powder which is a fine white powder which helps to clot the bleeding and to add a dressing on the paw and put paw inside a dog sock and left it on for a few hours, bleeding stopped thankfully and dog was fine really, licking her paw is all but wagging her tail quite happily!

The dog was fine by the way, gave a yelp and pulled back her leg and I got a shock at how much blood came out, needless to say i was nervous about trimming dog nails again but since was part of the job, I had to and slowly over time began to get used to trimming nails with clips and never forgot that and was always cautious thereafter. (Dogs nail did grow back eventually btw)

The dog still trusted me afterwards :)

I find that dogs with good temperaments are much more forgiving and still love you no matter what ;)
 

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Mrs. Slap just bought a pair of dog nail clippers to do our 3 pups; vet charges $15 USD for each dog.

I know clipping "into the quick" is a common mistake, and that dogs recover quickly from it, but because of the possibility of even slightly hurting my babies, I can't muster the courage to do it....I'd rather pay the vet :unsure:
 

DoubleDutch

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BTW : recently a nail of my lab was pulled out completely by the vet (there was in infection behind it). Without a warning PULL. It bled yes.
Kept it clean and it ended well.
 

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