How can i make it stop!

Byron

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It's neolamprologus similis

This species inhabits the shorelines of Lake Tanganyika. There is not a strong current, so don't overdo the water movement. In my opinion current is not an issue with cyanobacteria any more than it is with problem algae, but that is just my opinion for what it may be worth. :fish:
 
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connorlindeman

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There is not a strong current, so don't overdo the water movement. In my opinion current is not an issue with cyanobacteria any more than it is with problem algae, but that is just my opinion for what it may be worth.
ok. So onc the plants grow larger, the problem will diminish?
 

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ok. So onc the plants grow larger, the problem will diminish?

I have glanced through the start of this thread, and what was mentioned as being algae became cyanobacteria. Cyanobacteria is caused by organics in the presence of light, nothing else. Blackouts work but only temporarily, because the high organic load is still there and will feed cyanobacteria (or problem algae) once light is restored. Reduce the organics. This can involve stocking levels (likely not the issue given the species here), overfeeding, vacuuming the substrate very well at each substantial water change. Light may have to be curtailed, and here intensity and spectrum play into it. Floating plants are very rapid growing and would use nutrients and provide shade. You may already have some, but Vallisneria loves hard water and is native to the rift lakes, and is also fast growing (using more nutrients).
 

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