Controlling Nitrate

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topc

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Hi,

All the guides I keep reading say to keep Nitrate levels under control by carrying out water changes.

Trouble is, Where I come from the Nitrate level in the tap water is as high as 80ppm.
So obviously I'm never going to get Nitrate below that with any amount of water change. In the tank the levels are lower at about 30ppm and I guess the plants are using some of it up.

Anyone know of a safe sure way of dropping Nitrate from water that is going to be used for a water change? or getting it down in the tank.
I'm using an external filter, 25 Galls, few fish so far.

M
 

EddieW

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Topc,

There are various products available, some to pre-filter the tap water and some to reduce nitrates in the tank.

Filters:
Reverse Osmosis - various units which produce virtually pure H2O. You will need to use special additives to balance the water chemistry for freshwater use. Can be quite expensive to purchase (and install if you aren't able to do it), fairly cheap to run.
Tap-water filters - various units which use replace cartridges to de-ionise the water. Again needs additives to balance the water chemistry. Cheaper to buy than RO units, cartridges add to the running costs. Easy to set up as you just stick them on the end of the tap. Some cartridges can be recharged using dishwasher salt.

In-tank:
Chemicals:
API Nitra-Zorb, Selectively removes nitrite, ammonia, and nitrate, For FRESHWATER aquariums only
TetraAqua NitrateMinus, granules that remove nitrate in a natural, biological process. For Fresh & Saltwater Aquariums
Interpet Nitrasafe, sachet placed directly into the aquarium or in the filter, rechargeable with a simple salt solution. Not suitable for use in Marine aquariums
Kent Nitrate Sponge, granular zeolitic medium, fosters anaerobic bacterial denitrification due to its physical porous structure.

Filter Media:
Additional media can be added to your existing filters to remove nitrates (and usually phosphates as well). PolyFilter is a recognised name and Juwel have apparently just brought one out as well.

Additional Filter unit:
D & D Rowa Sulphur Nitrate Filter - external filter unit that can be ADDED alongside your existing filtration to reduce nitrate over a period of time. Needs to be run at a very slow flow rate compared to normal filters. Don't kno0w a lot about these.

I have heard good and bad things about chemical nitrate removers, I am currently trying out the PolyFilter. I can't really advise one way or the other on the Sulpher Nitrate filter as never used one. The tap water filters and RO units are probably the best options, I think most people would opt for RO but cost can be an issue.

HTH, Eddie
 
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topc

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Thanks for your reply,

I'm grateful for the kind help offered her in this forum. Maybe one day when I learn a bit more I can return the favour!

Topc
 

njparton

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I use Green-X by Hagen that removes nitrates, nitrites and phosphates.

If you have high nitrates in your tap water, maybe there's a chance you'll have high phosphates too?

I put Green-X in my external filter as the last stage to prevent depriving my filter bacteria of nitrite. It comes in a tea bag like sack.

Works quite well, helps control algea blooms but I still need to do a 20-25% water change every weekend.

I've been looking out for Nitra-zorb at my LFS - I think I'll try that in future too.

I think the general rule of thumb is to keep nitrate levels below 40 mg/l as some fish are more suscpetible to disease above this level - you are right to be concerned.
 

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