Chances of hands-off breeding success for pseudomugil gertrudae

Tempestuousfury

Fish Aficionado
Joined
Sep 25, 2003
Messages
4,790
Reaction score
4
Location
Illinois
I just purchased a group of six yesterday, and they are rather amazing. The rather short lifespan is quite a downside, so I was wondering what the likelihood is of fry surviving to adulthood with:
  • heavy plants
  • floating and grounded mops
  • golden pearls 5-50 micron, one type of smaller food (e.g. microworms), and frozen baby brine shrimp
  • maybe a breeding net as I already own one for any lucky juveniles
  • very regular water changes
I know that this is asking a lot, but I cannot set up any more tanks atm or in the foreseeable future. I'm really only looking for replacement as opposed to a large batch; several failures are acceptable if there are at least a few successes. Crossing my fingers as I wait for your thoughts!
 

foxgirl158

Fishaholic
Joined
Jul 10, 2021
Messages
632
Reaction score
425
Location
USA
Sorry, this is in no way related to your question, but wow I feel like a lot of people who seem like original members are showing up all of a sudden! Welcome back :)
 

itiwhetu

Naturally First
Pet of the Month!
Joined
Apr 29, 2012
Messages
8,398
Reaction score
6,042
Location
Hokitika, New Zealand
If you have no other fish in the tank, there is a good chance. I would feed these fry with egg yolk like this
 

Colin_T

Fish Guru
Joined
Jan 26, 2008
Messages
35,062
Reaction score
18,621
Location
Perth, WA
A lot of people breed Pseudomugil rainbowfish (blue eyes) in single species tanks. That is how I did it and most people in ANGFA do it. Basically, set up a single species tank, have an air operated sponge filter or undergravel filter in the tank. Have plants or a spawning mop in the tank. Feed the adults well, do lots of water changes, and either scoop the fry out and move to a rearing tank, or pick eggs from plants or mops and move to rearing tanks, or leave the fry to grow up with the parents.

Most Pseudomugils do not eat their eggs or young if the adults are well fed and there are some plants in the tank. This means you can have fry with the adults. Most fry get eaten by older bigger fry and this is more likely to happen in small tanks with hungry fish.

One of the members on this forum @vanalisa is breeding Psedumugils furcatus (post #14 of the following link has a video of her fish).

One thing you can do is gravel clean the tank into a white bucket. Let the water settle and use a torch to look for eggs in the bucket. Some rainbowfish prefer to lay eggs in the substrate rather than plants, and the eggs get sucked out when you do a water change and gravel clean. the eggs can be collected up and put into a hatching tank or the breeding net but a hatching tank is generally safer. Some fish learn they can suck eggs through a breeding net.
 

Most reactions

Top