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Can you really grow willow in aquariums?

Discussion in 'Plant Identification & Biology' started by QualityAquatics21, Aug 7, 2019.

  1. QualityAquatics21

    QualityAquatics21 New Member

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    so there was a really big storm last night and I came outside this morning and a piece of willow ( one piece alive other not so much). Could I put this in my tank?
     
  2. PheonixKingZ

    PheonixKingZ Fish Herder
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    Do you mean a piece (as in stick) of Willow? :)
     
  3. QualityAquatics21

    QualityAquatics21 New Member

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    Yeah it’s a stick.
     
  4. PheonixKingZ

    PheonixKingZ Fish Herder
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    There is one downside to using willow branches in your tank.....willow is a very soft wood, and it will rot pretty quickly. ;)
     
  5. QualityAquatics21

    QualityAquatics21 New Member

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    Oh. What about the live one? Will it grow? What wood can I use in aquariums?
     
  6. Colin_T

    Colin_T Member

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    Willow trees will not grow in aquariums. They are terrestrial plants that need air around their roots.
     
  7. QualityAquatics21

    QualityAquatics21 New Member

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    Ok. Would maple work?
     
  8. Colin_T

    Colin_T Member

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    Maple is a terrestrial tree as well. If you want plants to grow up and out of the water, look for marsh plant like Hygrophilas and Alternantheras.
     
  9. QualityAquatics21

    QualityAquatics21 New Member

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    Oh I meant maple as drift wood.
     
  10. PheonixKingZ

    PheonixKingZ Fish Herder
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    I’m pretty sure Maple Trees will leach into the water. :)

    Here is a list, and a website of good driftwood types.

    • Manzanita Driftwood. Manzanita Driftwood 20"-24"
    • Cholla Wood.
    • Mopani Driftwood. Fluval Mopani Driftwood - Small - 4 X 9.8 in.
    • Malaysian Driftwood. Zilla Reptile Décor Malaysian Driftwood.
    • Spider Wood. Pisces AM-GOLD018 18" Medium Spiderwood, Varies.
    https://www.fishtanksetups.com/types-of-aquarium-driftwood/#what-are-the-types-of-aquarium-driftwood ;)

    Safe Wood for Freshwater Aquariums:
    • Alder
    • Apple
    • Beech
    • Birch
    • Cherry
    • Hawthorn
    • Heather
    • Oak
    • Pear
    • Sycamore
    • Manzinta
    • Cholla wood
    • Colophospermum mopane or Mopani
    • Malaysian
    • Rosewood roots
    • Mesquite
    • Ribbon wood
    • Madrona
    • Azalea
    • Button wood
    • Linden trees
    Toxic Trees that Should be Avoided:
    • Cedar
    • Evergreen
    • Grape vine
    • Horse chestnut
    • Lilac
    • Ivy
    • Walnut
    • Yew
    • Rhododendron
     
  11. Byron

    Byron Member

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    The list in post #9 above may be reasonably reliable. I am only saying that because some of what is listed especially the "do not use" species is accurate, those are highly toxic. I do know from discussions with biologists that oak and beech are safe as far as the wood itself, and the dried leaves of these trees. Maple leaves were deemed safe on some sites I came across a while back, so I would assume the wood is too, but this is just my assumption.

    Having said that, you are always safer to purchase wood from a reliable fish store. I know, it is expensive, but it should (note, I say "should") be safe. Malaysian Driftwood is what I have been using for years. The other types especially the branching wood is risky for toxic fungi.

    The other thing about collecting wood like oak and beech is that it must be completely dead dry, which means the wood must have become separated from the growing tree years ago so it can completely dry out. Then there is the issue of waterlogging so it will remain down in the tank and not float for months depending upon the size. And another issue is the collecting site; wood will readily absorb any liquid it comes into contact with, and there is no method to get these out quickly; they can leech out for months and even years, and in an aquarium this can be deadly due to the closed space.

    I use dried leaves from oak and maple, collected from my rear garden where I know there are no chemicals, pesticides, fertilizers, etc. I use small branches that the squirrels break off from the oak tree, after they have been on the ground for several months, and even then I leave them in a dry room for months before use. I would never risk larger or thicker chunks of wood.
     
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