Can rasbora espei and peacock gudgeons live in a PH of 8.0-8.2?

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Rocky998

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I don't like the "oxidizing chemical" that is not named. And most assuredly the salt. I understand these may or may not be relatively harmless but that depends upon the quantity.

Steven has posted, and I concur. Except, the problem now is that hard water fish need hard water, and as this softened water is all you have in the pipes...??
This is all we have access to... I am not to worried about the chemical because its at the first dtage of filtration and then passes through other filters and by then is probably not even in the water or if it is, it is an extremely low amount... And the salt amount is probably so small you couldnt register it.
 
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So it sounds like the utility is softening the water. This is annoying as there is basically no (easy) way getting around the fact that your water is softened. You should ask your local fish store how they deal with this.

Honestly, I'm not sure which fish would survive well in softened water. A low GH and a high KH is not something you would find in nature. I'm not sure how fish would deal with it.

Ignoring the softened water problem for now, have you considered other species of fish besides Rasbora espei? There are plenty of fish that are comfortable in hard water. I think you said this is a 20 gallon high? Shelldwellers would be the most interesting choice in my opinion, though you would have to re-scape your aquarium and you wouldn't be able to keep anything else. You could replace the rasboras with an appropriate Pseudomugil species or maybe Glowlight danios. Centromochlus perugiae would be another really cool species too. There are some really interesting livebearers too, like Montezuma swordtails.
I really want peacock gudgeons... And they can survive in alkaline water (7-7.8 PH and sometimes higher)
 

vanalisa

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I chose fish for my tank that occupy the same waters in nature. Best way to find additional fish species is to research natural habitat.
(Keeping in mind other aspects, of course, such as where they hang out in the tank, numbers required, m/f ratio, etc.).

These work:
IMG_20210814_142019.jpg
 
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I chose fish for my tank that occupy the same waters in nature. Best way to find additional fish species is to research natural habitat.
(Keeping in mind other aspects, of course, such as where they hang out in the tank, numbers required, m/f ratio, etc.).

These work:
View attachment 149040
This water is not natural... You may want to read some of the things talked about here...
 

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he treatment process begins with aeration, which causes the metals to begin oxidizing (rusting) naturally. Aeration also removes most of the hydrogen sulfide in the water. After some detention time, an oxidizing chemical is added to ensure that oxidation is complete before filtering. Any metals not fully oxidized will simply pass through the filters. The filters also remove any remaining hydrogen sulfide.

I don't like the "oxidizing chemical" that is not named. And most assuredly the salt. I understand these may or may not be relatively harmless but that depends upon the quantity.
The first stage of theproces is to remove metals like iron manganese, uranium. these metals may be soluble if they are bonded to sulfide or chloride. But the oxide form is not soluble. So to remove these metals you put carbonate or hydroxide in the water like sodium hydroxide or sodium bicarbonate. The sodium reacts with the metals converting them to oxides which typically settle at the bottom of the tank.It is commonly done at many utilities with hard water sources.

Then they soften the water....

As to the impact of this water on human health, well size maters. because of our size we need a lot of sodium and potassium and the amount in the drinking water is likely not enough to satisfy daily needs. So food is still the primary source of sodium and potassium for people. but for a small fish in many gallons of water it would have a greater effect. But given that this is a utility they are probably aware of the risks of sodium and potassium and could easily be using a mix of sodium and photassium in the softening process. Meaning the fisk to you and your fish might not be as bad as I ordiinally said. Can you provide a link to your utility ? I would like to see the water qualityreport.

however all that said your water as it is right now is still a risk and if you want plants most fertilizes on the market will not work.

Thebest think you can do iso to get yourself a RO system. You can then start off with very clean water and just add a GH booster to the water to get the GH up to a level appropriate for your fish. If you want plants then we would have to come up with a fertilizer plan.
 
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The first stage of theproces is to remove metals like iron manganese, uranium. these metals may be soluble if they are bonded to sulfide or chloride. But the oxide form is not soluble. So to remove these metals you put carbonate or hydroxide in the water like sodium hydroxide or sodium bicarbonate. The sodium reacts with the metals converting them to oxides which typically settle at the bottom of the tank.It is commonly done at many utilities with hard water sources.

Then they soften the water....

As to the impact of this water on human health, well size maters. because of our size we need a lot of sodium and potassium and the amount in the drinking water is likely not enough to satisfy daily needs. So food is still the primary source of sodium and potassium for people. but for a small fish in many gallons of water it would have a greater effect. But given that this is a utility they are probably aware of the risks of sodium and potassium and could easily be using a mix of sodium and photassium in the softening process. Meaning the fisk to you and your fish might not be as bad as I ordiinally said. Can you provide a link to your utility ? I would like to see the water qualityreport.

however all that said your water as it is right now is still a risk and if you want plants most fertilizes on the market will not work.

Thebest think you can do iso to get yourself a RO system. You can then start off with very clean water and just add a GH booster to the water to get the GH up to a level appropriate for your fish. If you want plants then we would have to come up with a fertilizer plan.
I have plants in my tank now that are thriving... The java ferns are growing fairly quickly as well as the anubias... My floating plants are not doing so well and I have algae growing on the floater roots that has anchored it to some drift wood... I will try to find the water quality report but I don't like sharing it as it has my city name all over it
 
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This is a definite no go for me... Wayyyy to expensive for me. BUT, I may be able to use distilled water which my mom does frequently buy anyways
Thebest think you can do iso to get yourself a RO system
 

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Your floating plants are not growing because your pH is too high. The simplest way to deal with your problem is to reduce your water changes back to near zero and let the organics in the tank take effect. Remember that all organic reactions are acid based and acid is produced from all organic reactions, therefore your tank will become acidic overtime if you stop adding fresh water to it.
 
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Your floating plants are not growing because your pH is too high. The simplest way to deal with your problem is to reduce your water changes back to near zero and let the organics in the tank take effect. Remember that all organic reactions are acid based and acid is produced from all organic reactions, therefore your tank will become acidic overtime if you stop adding fresh water to it.
I have only done one water change and that was to unclog the filter... Otherwise I have not done one single water change since I've gotten the tank set up
 
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Your floating plants are not growing because your pH is too high. The simplest way to deal with your problem is to reduce your water changes back to near zero and let the organics in the tank take effect. Remember that all organic reactions are acid based and acid is produced from all organic reactions, therefore your tank will become acidic overtime if you stop adding fresh water to it.
Is there a way to add acids during water changes?
 

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I have only done one water change and that was to unclog the filter... Otherwise I have not done one single water change since I've gotten the tank set up
Yes, but you have been adding ammonia to it and you haven't given the organic part of the tank a chance to take over. Now is the time to allow the natural processes a chance to bring the tank back to something you can use to support life.
 

itiwhetu

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Is there a way to add acids during water changes?
Proteins are the building blocks of life, and they are made of amino acids. All life requires acids to function, your tank will produce acid when it has life in it. That is why I say more plants at this stage, then fish. You are so close to being able to put fish in this system. But please get your pH right first. By the way RO water was never designed for use in aquariums so be careful going down that track.
 
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Yes, but you have been adding ammonia to it and you haven't given the organic part of the tank a chance to take over. Now is the time to allow the natural processes a chance to bring the tank back to something you can use to support life.
But even my tap has a really high PH... It won't help if the tank gets more acidy... If my water is alkaline and I'm doing lets say, a 25% water change weekly... Its going to be the PH of my tap and maybe a bit lower, but my KH will just reject it cause its at a 12-14
 

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You mentioned vinegar. We used to use vinegar at the fish shows to liven the fish up for judging would work a treat on any acid loving fish. I also used vinegar to have a pH drop when I spawned Kuhli loaches. I managed to get eggs no fry.
 
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Proteins are the building blocks of life, and they are made of amino acids. All life requires acids to function, your tank will produce acid when it has life in it. That is why I say more plants at this stage, then fish. You are so close to being able to put fish in this system. But please get your pH right first. By the way RO water was never designed for use in aquariums so be careful going down that track.
Ok, maybe I can get a few root tabs and put some Amazon swords in? How do I put the root tabs in and do I put the roots in the root tabs?
 

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