Anubias growth in high and low flow

Rocky998

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Before I did my complete reshape, the large anubias plant was closest to the filter output and the smaller ones were further away. Well I would get new leaves on the larger anubias every few weeks while the other ones never got any new leaves. I didn't think anything of it until I did the reshape. My larger anubias plant is now near the center and then I have the small one on the far left (furthest from filter output) and the medium one is closest to the filter output. Well the far left anubias actually lost a leaf a few days ago and the large anubias has stopped growing leaves. The medium one recently grew two new leaves and continues to grow!

I just thought I would share this data as I found it very interesting. Maybe they do better in high flow aquariums where the nutrients flow towards them
 

Byron

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That is a plausible conclusion, but may not be accurate as there are other factors to consider. Plants from tropical areas remain growing all year, unlike plants in temperate regions that are mainly deciduous. But all plants do need periods of rest. The "winter" when the leaves fall off is the rest period in temperate plants, but tropical species have periods when new growth does not occur. I plainly saw this with my Echinodorus (sword) plants. So the lack of new leaves could be due to this as much (or more) than from water flow.

With respect to water current though, most plants fare better in still water or a relatively slow current. I saw this too with my Echinodorus in the 5-foot tank...plants placed in the direct flow from the canister filter paled in comparison to the others, and it was only when I happened to rescape and moved the plants that I realized the impact of current. Java Fern is one plant that seems to tolerate strong current quite well; it makes a good plant to attach to a chunk of wood or rock used to "hide" the filter return.
 
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Rocky998

Rocky998

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That is a plausible conclusion, but may not be accurate as there are other factors to consider. Plants from tropical areas remain growing all year, unlike plants in temperate regions that are mainly deciduous. But all plants do need periods of rest. The "winter" when the leaves fall off is the rest period in temperate plants, but tropical species have periods when new growth does not occur. I plainly saw this with my Echinodorus (sword) plants. So the lack of new leaves could be due to this as much (or more) than from water flow.

With respect to water current though, most plants fare better in still water or a relatively slow current. I saw this too with my Echinodorus in the 5-foot tank...plants placed in the direct flow from the canister filter paled in comparison to the others, and it was only when I happened to rescape and moved the plants that I realized the impact of current. Java Fern is one plant that seems to tolerate strong current quite well; it makes a good plant to attach to a chunk of wood or rock used to "hide" the filter return.
Yeah. That is true.
These are just my conclusions on it though. It seems as if the anubias that is closest to the flow gets the most growth. That anubias wasn't growing at all since I got it and now that it is by the output it is getting new leaves.
 

Byron

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Yeah. That is true.
These are just my conclusions on it though. It seems as if the anubias that is closest to the flow gets the most growth. That anubias wasn't growing at all since I got it and now that it is by the output it is getting new leaves.

Yes, as I said, it is quite possibly part or all of the answer. Aquatic plants assimilate moree nutrients via leaves (rather than roots) than terrestrial plants, and some water flow does assist this uptake.
 

Colin_T

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Where are the plants located compared to the light?
If one plant is in the middle of the tank, it will be getting light from all around it. Whereas the plants on the side of the tank will only be getting light from one side.

There can be different growth rates among the same plants. I have seen it plenty of times where people put in a row of trees or plants. They are all in the same soil, get the same water and fertiliser, same sunlight, but some do well and others struggle. They are the same species of plant bought form the same nursery at the same time, but some do better than others. This could be what's happening in the tank. One of the plants might simply be stronger and better suited to those conditions compared to the other plants.

It would be interesting if it is related to water flow. Perhaps do more experiments with the plants and have groups in tanks with high flow and others with low flow and compare the results.
 
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Rocky998

Rocky998

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Where are the plants located compared to the light?
If one plant is in the middle of the tank, it will be getting light from all around it. Whereas the plants on the side of the tank will only be getting light from one side.

There can be different growth rates among the same plants. I have seen it plenty of times where people put in a row of trees or plants. They are all in the same soil, get the same water and fertiliser, same sunlight, but some do well and others struggle. They are the same species of plant bought form the same nursery at the same time, but some do better than others. This could be what's happening in the tank. One of the plants might simply be stronger and better suited to those conditions compared to the other plants.

It would be interesting if it is related to water flow. Perhaps do more experiments with the plants and have groups in tanks with high flow and others with low flow and compare the results.
My light spreads very evenly everywhere in my tank as far as I know. But it is possible there may be another reason...
I know anubias do come from flowing rivers.
 

Byron

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The genus occurs in tropical central and west Africa. Species in the genus are aquatic or semi-aquatic, and it is found in rivers, streams and in marshes. Kasselmann (2003) mentions that some species grow better as marsh/bog plants as opposed to fully submersed.
 
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Rocky998

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The genus occurs in tropical central and west Africa. Species in the genus are aquatic or semi-aquatic, and it is found in rivers, streams and in marshes. Kasselmann (2003) mentions that some species grow better as marsh/bog plants as opposed to fully submersed.
Yes. I've seen that as well... I will look into this more. All of my anubias in the tank are the same species
 

StevenF

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I resently rearranged my tank and decided to remove the Anubis but wanted to save it for possible later use. so I put it in a container with the roots submirged in fertilized water with the leave out of the water. Growth rate has roughly doubled. I don't know if it is because of nutrient differences or CO2 from the air.

You might want to try adjusting the flow on your filter higher or lower., or increase surface agitation of the water to drive more air to mix with the water in case you are low on CO2.
 
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Rocky998

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I resently rearranged my tank and decided to remove the Anubis but wanted to save it for possible later use. so I put it in a container with the roots submirged in fertilized water with the leave out of the water. Growth rate has roughly doubled. I don't know if it is because of nutrient differences or CO2 from the air.

You might want to try adjusting the flow on your filter higher or lower., or increase surface agitation of the water to drive more air to mix with the water in case you are low on CO2.
That's interesting! What species is it?
 
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Rocky998

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Nana. Most Anubiasare not fully aquatic. Another common name for the pothos. A common house plant grown in soil
Ah ok.
I noticed a new attribute to the anubias... I dropped the water during my water change below an anubias leaf and it quickly turned white... It was only a minute or so... All pure white. I was so worried but then it went under the water and turned green in no time.
 

Colin_T

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Ah ok.
I noticed a new attribute to the anubias... I dropped the water during my water change below an anubias leaf and it quickly turned white... It was only a minute or so... All pure white. I was so worried but then it went under the water and turned green in no time.
algae, biofilm or calcium deposits in/ on the leaves.
 
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Rocky998

Rocky998

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algae, biofilm or calcium deposits in/ on the leaves.
When the water drops, everything that was covered by water has a smell to it you can't forget 😂😂...
Maybe it is some sort of biofilm. Sounds reasonable
 

itiwhetu

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You are making big water changes to get below the Anubis in your other thread, why is that considering that there is only two fish in your tank.
 

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