Another ammonia issue

Ch4rlie

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Ah so if I got this correctly, it is up to 48 hours that Seachem Prime binds free ammonia into ammonium which is safer for livestock, however, once the Prime becomes depleted after 48 hours the ammonium will revert back to free ammonia which is now again toxic to livestock.

Hmm, I use Seachem Prime and must be careful about dosages etc but think once have completed this bottle, may revert back to another recommend brand of dechlorinator.
 

Byron

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Ah so if I got this correctly, it is up to 48 hours that Seachem Prime binds free ammonia into ammonium which is safer for livestock, however, once the Prime becomes depleted after 48 hours the ammonium will revert back to free ammonia which is now again toxic to livestock.

Hmm, I use Seachem Prime and must be careful about dosages etc but think once have completed this bottle, may revert back to another recommend brand of dechlorinator.

Correct. I have been using API Tap Water Conditioner for several years now, and I frankly see it as the best conditioner we have, if all one needs is a chlorine/chloramine agent; it also does heavy metals. And it is highly concentrated--with chlorine only one drop per gallon (Prime requires 2 drops), with chloramine 2 drops equally.
That means half as much is needed, which is less getting into the fish and less money...what is there not to like about this? :fish:

@Essjay uses this conditioner too, I think I introduced her to it quite a while back.
 

Essjay

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@Essjay uses this conditioner too, I think I introduced her to it quite a while back.
I'd actually found it myself in a local shop ;) When I read the dosage I decided that was the one. It was only later when I read the ingredients that I realised it was one of, if not the, best dechlorinator.
That shop closed in 2010 (two weeks after they gave me a credit note :mad:), and I now have to buy it on-line.
 
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letterman7

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Not to argue, just for discussion - did any of you actually try an independent test between the two products? I did here - I thought the same thing with the API: takes less product and works better. But it doesn't. API is half as effective at removing chlorine/chloramines as SeaChem, at least in our in-home test.
 

Essjay

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The API product needs a higher dose when dealing with chloramine, and it does not detoxify the ammonia released when chloramine is split. But it is a very good dechlorinator where tap water contains chlorine rather than chloramine (like mine).
Like the API product, Prime splits chloramine and removes the chlorine part, but it also detoxifies the ammonia part until the bacteria/plants in the tank have had chance to remove it. This is probably the better product where tap water contains chloramine.
 

Ch4rlie

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The API product needs a higher dose when dealing with chloramine, and it does not detoxify the ammonia released when chloramine is split. But it is a very good dechlorinator where tap water contains chlorine rather than chloramine (like mine).
Like the API product, Prime splits chloramine and removes the chlorine part, but it also detoxifies the ammonia part until the bacteria/plants in the tank have had chance to remove it. This is probably the better product where tap water contains chloramine.
How can one tell if their tap contains chlorine or chloramine?

Is there a test for this or can this information be found on water suppliers website?
 

Essjay

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Some water companies tell you on their website, others you have to contact them to ask. When I do a google search for "Northumbrian water chlorine chloramine" (my water company) I get a pdf saying about adding chlorine to drinking water. They don't mention chloramine. In the section about noticeable smells it also says
You can try filling a jug of water, covering it and then leaving it in the fridge for a few hours. Chlorine levels will reduce over time, so do not leave it for longer than 24 hours as the disinfectant effect of the chlorine will also reduce over time and will no longer be protected from bacterial growth.
If the level deceases over time, it can't be chloramine.


My tap water reads zero for ammonia both before and after adding dechlorinator so I don't need to worry about using a water conditioner which detoxifies ammonia. I have read posts where tap water contains 0.25 ppm ammonia or higher and if I had this level I would use a water conditioner which detoxifies ammonia.
 
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letterman7

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Quicky update; after a week and one 75% water change early on, we have now attained 0% ammonia and a stable 6.8pH. Even the plants look better. Dunno what happened, damn sure I'm not going to let it happen again!
 

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