Welcome to Our Community

Wanting to join the rest of our members? Feel free to sign up today.

Stocking ideas for 180l

Discussion in 'New to the Hobby Questions and Answers' started by NuclearTeapot, Nov 23, 2017.

  1. NuclearTeapot

    NuclearTeapot New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2017
    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    0
    I'm in the process of cycling a 180l tank and am a little stuck on what stock with. My stocking ideas atm are
    1 or 2 Angels (if two both will be female)
    2 gourami of some sort
    A school of tetra (preferable something unusual)
    Kuhli loaches
    6-8 x Corys

    Is this too much?

    Any thing to change, open to anything!
    Thanks

     
  2. NuclearTeapot

    NuclearTeapot New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2017
    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    0
    *** potentially keyhole cichlids instead of something? But not sure
     
  3. Byron

    Byron Member

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2009
    Messages:
    5,947
    Likes Received:
    793
    Location:
    CA
    Welcome to TFF. :hi:

    The stocking mentioned has issues that are not so much due to the actual fish mass/water volume ratio, but more to the fish species requirements themselves.

    Chichlids (angelfish) and gourami should never be combined in the same aquarium, with very few exceptions and large tanks. Basically they are very similar in their temperament, males being highly territorial. Just as you would not have more than one species of cichlid in this tank, you also shouldn't have cichlid and gourami.

    On the angelfish themselves, this is not advisable. This is a shoaling species, meaning the fish live in groups. They develop an hierarchy; males are territorial, so there needs to be a good amount of space (primarily in tank length) to accommodate this. In nature the space is basically infinite but in any aquarium it is immediately limited and this affects the fish. A group should be five minimum, but there is certainly insufficient space in a 180 liter (47 gallon) tank whatever the dimensions. The only way two angelfish should be considered for any tank is if they are a mated/bonded pair (male/female), which of course adds issues like spawning, other fish, etc. I would forget angelfish and consider gourami; you could have some lovely Pearl Gourami here. Avoid the Blue/Gold/Cosby/Opaline/Three-Spot/Marble gourami as these are all varieties of the one species Trichopodus trichopterus and notorious for bad behaviour to each other and frequently other non-gourami species.

    If you want either cories or kuhli loaches, make sure the substrate is soft sand. Play sand works very well. Both species will only be at their best with sand, for differing reasons.

    Before we start considering other shoaling species, we need to know the source water parameters (GH, pH and KH). There are lots of options, but some will be more demanding than others when it comes to parameters. :fish:

    Byron.
     
    #3 Byron, Nov 23, 2017
    Last edited: Nov 23, 2017
  4. NuclearTeapot

    NuclearTeapot New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2017
    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thank you for the informative reply! Okay I'll skip the angels. I love cichlids but obviously limited in this tank. I'll find out my parametres for you now!
    My substrate is sand so ready for corys or kuhlis once tank is cycled. I'll get back to you in a second.
     
  5. NuclearTeapot

    NuclearTeapot New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2017
    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    0
    Okay so I'm not very good at reading these things so [​IMG] I hope thats what you need. My ph sits at about 7/7.2 based on the test Ive just done.

    http://tinypic.com/r/2ypn4ls/9
     
  6. Byron

    Byron Member

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2009
    Messages:
    5,947
    Likes Received:
    793
    Location:
    CA
    If that is your water in the linked chart, it is "soft" and perfect for the fish such as those you listed along with most from South America or SE Asia. Avoid livebearers and any other species requiring harder water.

    The units used for hardness in the hobby are primarily degrees (dGH or dH, the "degrees German" in your linked chart) and ppm (parts per million, which is the same as mg/l [milligrams per liter]) which is the CaCO3 mg/l Water Hardness" in that same chart. You can convert back and forth using 17.9, so multiplying dGH by 17.9 gives you the ppm, and dividing ppm by 17.9 gives the equivalent dGH. So 83 ppm divided by 17.9 equates to 4.67 dGH as in the chart.

    The KH (carbonate hardness or Alkalinity) is usually close to the GH, and the KH serves to buffer the pH. Here you can expect the pH to probably lower a bit as the aquarium becomes established, and this too is fine for soft water species.

    To your fish species...as I mentioned, gourami are an option, and if you decide on one of them the tankmates need to be similarly quiet (non-active swimming, not likely to fin nip). Lots to choose from among the rasbora and characins (tetras, pencilfish, hatchetfish), plus cories, loaches. Here I should mention that if you do decide on a gourami species, cories will be OK but kuhli loaches are a bit active nocturnally and this can unsettle sedate fish like gourami. Combining cories and loaches is something I tend not to suggest, not for any aggressive basis, but more because the more you have (cories especially) the happier they will be, and this takes up space at the substrate level. In other words, a group of say 20 cories (same or mixed species) will be much happier and thus healthier, than say a group of 8 cories and thee loaches. I have 50+ cories, and two loach species (not kuhli) in different tanks but I would never consider having them together.

    Byron.
     
  7. NuclearTeapot

    NuclearTeapot New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2017
    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    0

    Great thank you, I can definitely understand that better now. I'm not a huge fan of live bearers anyway. Yes that is my water got it from my suppliers website after searching my postcode.
    Thank you for making my first post here a positive and informative one! I'll ditch the angels and potentially go for some pretty gouramis.. I cant really think of any larger fish to have as a "centre piece" but obviously I don't want to restrict my other fish choices.

    Ive got a little while before this tank is cycled so I've got plently of time to think
     
  8. Byron

    Byron Member

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2009
    Messages:
    5,947
    Likes Received:
    793
    Location:
    CA
    You'rte welcome. Just run your ideas past us here before acquiring any fish, and you will be home free. Gourami for instance...some are real terrors worse than many cichlids, others as peaceful as lambs (sort of ;) ).

    Cycling...are you intending live plants? This makes a difference in how you cycle,or can cycle.
     
  9. NuclearTeapot

    NuclearTeapot New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2017
    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    0
    Great!

    Just looking into Gourams,, how about the paradise fish. Obviously in a community tank want a more peaceful one (hopefully )
    Or keyhole cichlids or even curviceps? Or am i running a risk of my tetra and corys potentially being eaten with any of those?
    I see a lot of people may keep a ram in the tank with some of those, would this potentially be another stock choice?

    I am intending live plants. Is there a different way to do it when using live?
     
  10. Byron

    Byron Member

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2009
    Messages:
    5,947
    Likes Received:
    793
    Location:
    CA
    Paradise fish--not a good community fish for the average aquarium. Smaller fish will be eaten, fins will be nipped, and any similar-looking fish will be attacked. Very aggressive with its own, males in breeding form will often kill rivals; females are less aggressive.

    Keyhole cichlid--very peaceful except when spawning. This is a very shy and retiring species, easily frightened and should not be combined with other more aggressive cichlids. Peaceful characins, rasbora, and substrate fish are ideal as "dither fish" to lessen this species' natural shyness.

    Curviceps--I am not directly familiar with this species (Laetacara curviceps) but I gather it is also a fairly peaceful cichlid. We could get more info easily enough, and there may be members with experience.

    Rams...the common or blue ram in any of its man-made varieties needs warm water, 80F (27 C) minimum, and this cannot be tolerated long-term by many other species, so with this ram you are limiting options. Cories for example would be out, except for a couple species like Corydoras sterbai. But not every cory enthusiast agrees with any cory being "warm water." The Bolivian Ram is better in community tanks; this is the only cichlid I bother with any longer for this reason. A sole Bolivian Ram in a community tank works very well. A pair but only if they have bonded (rams must select their own mate, they will not accept many).

    On the plants and cycling, if you have some fast-growing plants--and here floating plants are the best--you donot need to "cycle" as such. Plants take up ammonia/ammonium as their preferred form of nitrogen, and they can assimilate a lot of it. Once you have the plants growing, adding fish little by little is all you need to do. You will never have ammonia or nitrite above zero. Floating plants also have a benefit long term, as all forest fish appreciate a "roof" above them. Gourami need floating plants, they will never be free of stress without floaters. And most other fish lean the same way.
     
  11. NuclearTeapot

    NuclearTeapot New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2017
    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    0
    Ah I'll avoid the paradise fish then and have a look into keyhole cichlids and curviceps a bit more.

    So a single Bolivian ram could be a possiblity, but not the others, thats good to know. I've read so much conflicting information online so a forum was definitely the place to come.
    Ahh i never knew that was possible with plants. I have a few ready to go in but i dont thinkany of them are that fast growing. Trying to source some floating ones but no where around me seems to have any or any that I've noticed.
     
  12. NickAu

    NickAu Member

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2015
    Messages:
    3,315
    Likes Received:
    922
    Location:
    AU
    If you get Kuhli loaches get at least 10 and give them lots of hiding places, giving them hiding places makes them feel safe and that in turn means they come out more. I have 15 in a 2 foot heavily planted tank.

    A healthy male Pearl Gourami in breeding mode is one of the best looking fish in the hobby. ( After Bettas )
     
  13. NuclearTeapot

    NuclearTeapot New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2017
    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thank you, yes one of my local lfs stocks them so going to call ahead of getting them to make sure they have enough
     

Share This Page