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Questions regarding proudcts

Discussion in 'New to the Hobby Questions and Answers' started by Vorka, Nov 24, 2017.

  1. Vorka

    Vorka New Member

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    Hello all!

    I was looking at getting some API stress coat and was wondering if it is OK to use with Corys? Is it safe to use alongside Tetra Safestart and Tetra AquaSafe?

    We are starting to add fish to the tank and was looking to use the stresa coat to help the fish settle in is it a product worth using for this or are the above products OK for that? Does the product cause flashing? I use both AS and SS with water changes.

    Thanks!

     
  2. NickAu

    NickAu Member

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    I dont use or recommend this product because it has Aloe Vera in it,
     
  3. Byron

    Byron Member

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    Aloe vera as Nick mentioned is one problem (this has been shown to affect fish gills long-term, plus it messes with the tank's biological system). As for what is might do to help fish settle in...that is highly debatable. There is no doubt that fish can settle in as well if not better without it.

    Which brings me to the main point of my post. The fewer additives/substances added to the water in an aquarium with fish, the better the fish will be, meaning less stressed and healthier. Fish have a very unique relationship with the water they live in; 80% of a fish is water, and this water is separated from the water the fish lives in by a permeable membrane, thee cell. Water is continually passing through into the fish, along with any substances in the water; these enter the fish's bloodstream and thus get to the organs. Something similar happens in the gills. The fewer additives in thee water, the less chemical stuff inside the fish to hamper its physiology and metabolism.

    With that understanding, additives should only be what is absolutely essential. If we use tap water with chlorine, we must use a dechlorinator. But beyond this, unless there is some specific problem requiring additives or medications, leave them out.

    You Tetra AquaSafe is a dechlorinator. I cannot seem to track down exactly what is in it, and this annoys me as I like to know what I am putting in the water. But from the description, it seems to be OK. It dechlorinates, detoxifies heavy metals, and adds vitamins--none of this is bad.

    Tetra SafeStart is OK initially, as it adds beneficial nitrifying bacteria. But once the tank is cycled and has fish in it, I don't see a need to continue this product.

    The StressCoat we already determined is not beneficial, and somewhat the opposite.

    Clean water, achieved by not overstocking, not overfeeding, not using unnecessary additives, and weekly partial water changes of a good volume, is what fish need to be healthy.

    Byron.
     
  4. essjay

    essjay Member

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    Tetra's website says about Tetra AquaStart "Protects gills and mucous membrane of fish". This sounds suspiciously like it contains aloe vera or one of the other products added to some dechlorinators.
     
  5. Byron

    Byron Member

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    I saw that too, but couldn't find out just what they use. They do specify aloe vera in StressCoat, so perhaps we can assume it is something else in AS. There are many (the majority) of conditioners that claim to benefit fish slime coat and related issues. This paper details them:

    https://www.researchgate.net/profil...ted_injury/links/5598108e08ae99aa62ca1f6a.pdf
     
  6. essjay

    essjay Member

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    I can't access that link as it has emoticons inserted in it :)

    I do have a rather old link which lists various dechlorinators, but I have no idea if the products quoted still have the same formulation http://www.thetropicaltank.co.uk/rev-cond.htm
    This gives Tetra AquaSafe as containing sodium hydroxymethane sulfinate, polyvinyl pyrollidones (PVP), and organic hydrocolloids. The 'organic chelating compounds' in the list is probably EDTA, which is used in a lot of dechlorinators to bind metals .
     
  7. Byron

    Byron Member

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    I fixed that when I saw it, but that was after you tried it. Then I had to leave for the day.

    According to the paper I linked, AquaSafe has polyvinylpyrrolidone as the mucus layer protector, which agrees with your UK paper. The study notes that polymner-based mucus protectors are common in many conditioners, and further study is needed to ascertain harmful effects if any. The findings that aloe vera is believed harmful is the primary finding for our purpose.
     

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