Welcome to Our Community

Wanting to join the rest of our members? Feel free to sign up today.

Please Help Me Diagnose

Discussion in 'Tropical Fish Emergencies' started by Deanasue, Jan 9, 2019.

  1. Deanasue

    Deanasue Fish Crazy

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2018
    Messages:
    342
    Likes Received:
    38
    Location:
    USA
    Thank you again, both of you. I am going to leave her in her tank since she is alone. I also want to finish the current treatment. I’m sure I can’t add methylene blue along with the other meds so I either need to cut out the MB it continuethe dips. I must say and many will disagree with me but...
    My tanks were all fine while using gravel. Since switching to sand, every single tank with sand has had issues. I am convinced that bad bacteria remains in sand. You can't clean The bottom like you can with gravel. Starting tonight, I am switching out my 5 tanks with sand and going back to gravel substrate. I never had a sick fish until I went to sand. Just my opinion and I’m sticking to it. Again,thanks guys. I hope Sky pulls through this but I do n’t know at this point.

     
    • Like Like x 1
  2. Guppylover3x

    Guppylover3x New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2019
    Messages:
    24
    Likes Received:
    2
    This all sounds sensible, I can’t comment because sand has never been of interest to me but I imagine it’s a lot harder to clean, so what you’re saying would make sense. I would recommend using medications for wound healing. Fingers crossed she will get better within time.
     
  3. Byron

    Byron Member

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2009
    Messages:
    7,854
    Likes Received:
    1,066
    Location:
    CA
    Keep in mind that you cannot remove "bad bacteria" from any substrate, be it sand, gravel, mud, whatever. Bacteria attaches to surfaces and I can assure you it is not easy to dislodge.

    Unless the sand was "used" from some other tank that was infected, it is not going to have harmful bacteria adhering to it except what occurs within your aquarium.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  4. Deanasue

    Deanasue Fish Crazy

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2018
    Messages:
    342
    Likes Received:
    38
    Location:
    USA
    Perhaps I use bad wording. I feel you can’t pick up debris such as food, poop, etc. as well which can contain bad bacteria. Big difference in what I get out of my gravel with my Python as opposed to what I’m able to suck out of the sand. We’ll see in a few months how I feel. Just bought 2 large bags of gravel. Tank #1 coming up. Oh, I do plan on continuing the med regimen along with the dips. Thanks, guys!
     
  5. Byron

    Byron Member

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2009
    Messages:
    7,854
    Likes Received:
    1,066
    Location:
    CA
    I'm not trying to change your mind about sand/gravel. There is no "bad bacteria" as such. The fish excrement that sinks into the substrate is no worse than the fish themselves. As for sucking it out, you have to be careful because this can impact an essential part of the tanks biological system. De-nitrification is as important as nitrification, and completes the whole cycle. I use the Python in tanks with sand the same as fine gravel, when I use it in the substrate; I tend to leave the substrate alone. I do dig into the sand in my pygmy cory tank because there are newly-hatched fry continuously in that tank and I think I am keeping the sand tidier for them. May not matter here either. But the only time the substrate needs more thorough cleaning such as with the Python is when the tank is overstocked, or otherwise biologically imbalanced. This can be a source of nitrates for example, similar to the filter not being kept clean. But sand or gravel should make no difference.

    Ironically, gravel is more harmful than sand, if it is too large. Pea gravel for example can be problematic because the detritus cannot get broken down as effectively as it can in sand. This can cause issues for substrate fish too.
     
  6. Deanasue

    Deanasue Fish Crazy

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2018
    Messages:
    342
    Likes Received:
    38
    Location:
    USA
    I respect your comments. Food for thought. I always clean deep in my goldfish tanks because they have such a heavy bio-load. I’ll watch how I clean and watch the parameters to get the right balance. Since the majority of bb is in the filter, I think I’ll be alright in switching along with most of the tank water to keep water balanced for fish. I also have extra seeding if I need it. One tank at a time and we’ll see how it goes.
     
  7. Colin_T

    Colin_T Member

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2008
    Messages:
    11,762
    Likes Received:
    450
    Location:
    Perth, WA
    Just have a thin layer of sand (10mm or 1/2inch thick) and use a gravel cleaner to go over it. Kink the syphon hose a bit if the sand looks like it is going to be sucked out and gravel clean away.

    On a side note, the Python gravel cleaners are not what I consider safe because they encourage people to refill the tank with tapwater that has not been dechlorinated before it goes in the tank. If you use it to drain the tank that is fine but all new water should be free of chlorine/ chloramine before it is added to the tank.

    -------------------------
    As Byron said, bacteria will get on everything including sand or gravel. The only reason I can think of that there would be an issue with the sand is if it was contaminated before you got it.

    If you need to sterilise sand or gravel, put it in a pot of water and boil it.

    Having said this, if you feel more comfortable using gravel, then use it :)
     
  8. Deanasue

    Deanasue Fish Crazy

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2018
    Messages:
    342
    Likes Received:
    38
    Location:
    USA
    Just an update on Sky. I seriously thought about euthanizing her 2 days ago because she was so sick and obviously in pain. I decided to finish the treatment and continue MB dips until course of treatment finished. Another fuzzy sore fell of and this time it didn’t grow back! Today she is swimming, eating and sore is healing. I think she’s going to make it!
     
  9. Deanasue

    Deanasue Fish Crazy

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2018
    Messages:
    342
    Likes Received:
    38
    Location:
    USA
    Finished! From sand back to gravel in the sorority tank. 1 down, 4 to go. Slow and steady wins the race!
     

    Attached Files:

  10. SiberianSiren

    SiberianSiren New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2017
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Could be columnaris or just a fungal infection growing over a wound. "The fungus spores can cause infections when the fish already has damaged gills or skin. They are typical secondary infections. White, cottony growth appears on the body of the fish. Anti-fungal medicines fight the infection." ~ Reefland.com I personally had a Bumblebee with columnaris. I kept her in a separate breeder tank and treated her with Erythromycin and Paraguard. Took two weeks and she lost part of a lip and cloudy eye, but is still alive several years later.
     
  11. lyn Pisces

    lyn Pisces Member

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2012
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Definitely looks like fungus from the pictures you posted with the white fuzzy stuff. Betta looks ok aside from sore spot left behind after fungus fell off. Is he eating ok? If he is, then he is probably feeling ok. Would keep eye on sore to make sure it does not get worse and just keep water clean. I used to use a Q-tip on my fish to apply treatment directly. Dip tip of Q-tip in Aquarium Salt (get in pet store - don't use cooking salt) mixed with de-chlorinated water and softly and gently wipe on wound with soft tipped Q-tip. Should heal in time... if not would probably use antibiotics. My bettas never seem to fare well when I used antibiotic treatment in their water but you may have to if wound gets much worse. Otherwise if getting better on its own may not need any drastic treatment.
     

Share This Page