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Plant mold

Discussion in 'Algae Removal' started by Classy, Apr 26, 2017.

  1. Classy

    Classy New Member

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    Hello! I recently found this mold/algae on my plant. I was wondering what this is and if this is harmful. IMG_0148.JPG

     
  2. Tyler_Fishman

    Tyler_Fishman Fish Crazy

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    I cannot seem to make out this photo, a nicer one would be appreciated
     
  3. DutchMuch

    DutchMuch Fish Addict

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    could you get a clearer image plz?
     
  4. DutchMuch

    DutchMuch Fish Addict

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    Does it look like this?
    upload_2017-4-26_22-2-32.jpeg
    Can you identify it from one of these: http://pets.thenest.com/types-aquarium-plant-fungus-12395.html
    • Green Spot Algae
      enjoys plenty of light. It forms green spots on aquarium glass and slow growing plants that are exposed to strong light. This algae will appear if CO2 and Phosphate (PO4) levels are low. Since it is very hard, algae eaters can't do much in eliminating this algae. Neritina snails are the only algae eaters I know that will graze on Green Spot Algae. It can be scraped manually off the glass with a razor blade or plastic card. In the case of an acrylic aquarium use plastic only. This algae is considered normal in small amounts. To prevent this algae, do weekly water changes, do not overfeed nor over-stock. In planted tanks keep slow growing plants in places where they will get less light (low light set-ups should not suffer from this algae in large extents) and keep Phosphate levels between 0.3-0.5ppm and CO2 levels 30 ppm.
      Photo credit: Dusko Bojic
      Note: The Green Spot algae in the Macro photo are no bigger than 1/8mm.
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    • Blue-Green Algae
      even though it's commonly called blue-green algae (BGA), it's not classified anymore as one. This "algae" is actually cyanobacteria, a form of life that has both animal and plant characteristics. It forms slimy, blue-green, sheets that will cover everything in a short time and give off a strong, characteristic scent. If left to over-run the tank, cyanobacteria may kill plants and even fish. It doesn't stick and can be easily removed manually, but will return quickly if the underlying water quality issue is not fixed. It can be treated with Erythromycin and other antibiotics, but this method should be done carefully since it might affect the nitrifying bacteria in the gravel and filter, and improper use of antibiotics always brings the risk of developing a more resistant strain. When the BGA gets killed by the algaecide it will start to rot and through that process it will reduce Oxygen levels in the tank. Since the nitrifying bacteria needs O2 to transfer ammonia/nitrites into nitrates the nitrifying process will slow down. If algaecide is used, make sure to test the ammonia/nitrite levels. Remove all the visible algae to prevent it from rotting in side the tank.

      Some aquarists use the black-out method previously described, where black bags are wrapped around the tank for 4 days and held in complete darkness. It is advisable to raise NO3 levels to 10-20 ppm before starting the black-out period. Manually remove as much BGA as you can before the blackout, and dead matter after the blackout.Egeria densa (Elodea) and Ceratophyllum demersum are good plants to have in a tank, since these plants are known to secrete natural antibiotic substances that can help prevent BGA. Establishing lots of healthy, fast-growing plants from the day you start the tank, dosing the nitrate levels to maintain 10-20 ppm, and vacuuming the gravel to keep the tank free of decaying matter is the best way to prevent this "algae". BGA can be found in aquariums with very low nitrates because it can fix atmospheric nitrogen. BGA seems not to like high CO2 levels and stronger water currents.
      Photo credit: Dusko Bojic
      Note: The second photo is photographed macro. The BGA are tiny threads that will in short time form a slime sheet.
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    • Green-slimy, water surface film
      This is a protein film. I don't know what type of algae grows in it. Taking a sample under the microscope would probably give some answers. The best way in combating slimy surface film is to improve surface agitation. Filter should be rinsed every week, so the water can flow better through it. To prevent it, use Active Carbon every 2-3 month for 3 weeks and Zeolite to get rid of the organics that tend to build up in aquariums, especially the older ones. 50% weekly water changes will help a lot in reducing organics. The film can be removed with paper towels. Black Mollies will eat this sort of algae. The aquarium shown in the photos are of a low light tank.
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    • Cladophora algae
      Cladophora is a branching, green filamentous alga, that forms a moss like structure. This algae doesn't appear to be slimy. Threads are very strong and very thin. It grows on rocks and submersed wood exposed to direct light, and in extreme cases will grow on plants also. Usually it tends to stay on one spot, which makes it easy to remove. Comb it and dose more CO2. In a case where Cladophora takes over the grassy plants, mow the plants like the lawn. No algae eater is known to eat this kind of algae.
      Photo credit: Dusko Bojic.
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    • Thread Algae
      grows on leaf edges as individual, up to 30 cm long threads. It is easily removed by twirling a tooth-brush around it. Excess iron is a possible reason. It is better to use substrate iron fertilisers, since this algae uptakes the iron from the water. Healthy plants will out-compete this algae. Algae eaters like SAE and Caridina japonica will consume it. Thread algae is very likely to appear together with the Hair algae.
      Photo credit: Irons
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    • Hair Algae
      forms around the base of slower growing plants, on gravel and bog-wood. It has green-gray color. It grows up to 4 cm, sometimes more. It is easy to remove this algae by twirling a tooth-brush around it. Most aquarists find this algae very welcome as a good food supplement for their fish. Most omnivorous fish like Angels or Barbs will supplement their diet with hair algae if not over-fed. In stronger water currents this algae forms matted clumps, as well as that, stronger water current will disturb their growth. All algae eaters will be more than happy to look after the Hair algae for you.
      Photo credit: Dusko Bojic
    • Staghorn Algae
      grows in long individual strands that form a few branches. It will grow close to the light source on equipment and plants. Strands can be pulled off the surface or in very bad cases the whole leaf should be discarded. Higher ammonia/ammonium levels (from overstocking or substrate disturbance) and low CO2 levels will favour this algae. It's been known that the Siamese Algae Eater will keep this algae in check. Nutrient control and healthy growing plants will limit Staghorn algae.
      Photo credit: Dusko Bojic
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    • Beard Algae
      can actually be an attractive addition to an aquarium on big pieces of stone and/or bogwood. It forms a thick green carpet over the surface closer to the light source. It is very soft and slippery but it is impossible to be removed mechanically. It can also be seen on slow growing plant leaves. It grows approximately 3 cm and the growth is rapid. The best way to control this algae is with the Siamese Algae Eater. Plecos are known to eat this algae, as well as Rosy barbs and Red Tailed Shark, but you should first check whether these fish are compatible with your other fish and with your tank size. Keeping lights for more than 12 hours a day will trigger this algae, as well as unbalanced nutrients. It will show up in planted tanks with low CO2 and NO3 levels. This algae can be found in low and high pH waters. Beard Algae is very common in non-planted aquariums.
      Photo credit: Dusko Bojic
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    • Fuzz Algae
      grow on leaves and plant stems not necessarily exposed to strong lights. The affected plants are probably suffering deficiency problems and are leaking nutrients back into the water. This algae is considered normal in small quantities. Aquariums with fish such as Siamese Algae Eater, Otos, Amano shrimp, Bristlenose pleco or Mollies will not suffer from this algae. Balanced nutrients will give head start against the algae.
      Photo credit: Gianmarco Bertaccini
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    • Brush/Red Algae (Black-brush algae)
      has been known to thrive in both acidic and alkaline waters. In hard waters it will form lime tissue (from biogenic decalcification) which makes it harder to be eaten by the only algae eater known to eat this type of algae, the Siamese Algae Eater (SAE). Biogenic decalcification can be prevented by adding CO2. Healthy fast growing plants will out-compete this feathery-black algae that tends to grow on slow growing plant leaves. When buying new plants, before planting, it's good to soak them into a weak household bleach solution for two minutes. 1 part of plain bleach (don't use bleach that has lemon, orange or any kind of scent) to 20 parts of water. Do not forget to rinse the plants well with clean water before adding them into the aquarium. The only perfect way to combat Brush algae is planting lots of healthy fast growing plants, introducing a few SAE, maintaining CO2 at 30 ppm, nitrates at 15 ppm and phosphates at 0.5 ppm. Leaves that are badly overtaken should be discarded.
      Photo credit: Dusko Bojic
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    • Green Dust Algae
      are actually zoospores and are commonly found on aquarium glass. They form a dusty looking, green patchy film and in severe cases can cover the whole aquarium glass. It's not known what actually causes this algae. Intense light is favored by GDA. Scraping it off the glass will not help remove this algae since it stays in the water and will float for 30-90 minutes before attaching it self again to the glass. For some reason those zoospores seem to avoid plants, rocks and wood and always go for the glass. Limiting nutrients will not help fighting this algae, but rather cause problems in planted tanks where plants will be exposed to nutrient deficiency and that condition will just favour other algae types. The best known solution for getting rid of GDA has been proposed by Tom Barr. He claims that this algae should be left alone to grow, without wiping the glass for about 10-20 days. After this period GDA will start forming a thick patchy film that will start falling off the glass. When this starts happening it is good to remove this algae out of the tank. This method should keep this algae at bay.
      Photo credit: Dusko Bojic
     
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  5. Classy

    Classy New Member

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    Okay I got a clearer picture.
     

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  6. DutchMuch

    DutchMuch Fish Addict

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    Did it look Similar to anything I posted above? Im sorry im just presuming its your camera I still cant make it out lol
     
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  7. StevenF

    StevenF Member

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    You are getting the camera too close to the subject and as a result it is out of focus. for I phones you often get very good results by zooming in as much as possible and then gradually moving the phone further away until the image is clear. I believe this methode will work for other phones. As the pictures are right now they are too fuzzy for any identification of the issue.
     

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