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PH is it a problem?

Discussion in 'New to the Hobby Questions and Answers' started by Flossybean, Dec 6, 2018 at 5:45 AM.

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  1. Flossybean

    Flossybean New Member

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    Hi there my ph has gone up to 8 , i have platys and guppies, is this a problem?
    I measured my tap water and that is 8 also.
    Using API test kit.
    0 ammonia
    0 nitrite
    O.5 nitrate
    Kh 6
    Gh 12
    Thanks in advance.

     
    #1 Flossybean, Dec 6, 2018 at 5:45 AM
    Last edited: Dec 6, 2018 at 6:10 AM
  2. Colin_T

    Colin_T Member

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    As long as there is no ammonia in the water, a pH of 8.0 is fine for livebearers like platies and guppies.
     
  3. Flossybean

    Flossybean New Member

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    Thank you , would it be alright for me to have a clown pleco?
    Thanks again x
     
  4. Colin_T

    Colin_T Member

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    It's probably a bit high for clown plecos unless they have been captive bred for many generations.

    A normal common bristlenose catfish would probably be ok with the higher pH.
     
  5. Flossybean

    Flossybean New Member

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    Thank you x
     
  6. Byron

    Byron Member

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    While I agree a high pH is OK for livebearers because they need harder water and a basic pH (basic meaning above 7.0), there is more to this if the pH has significantly changed, and you should pin down why.

    What is the pH of the source water (presumably tap water) on its own? If you test pH, with tap water you must first out-gas the dissolved CO2 or the reading may not be accurate (it will usually be lower than what is actually is, depending upon the level of CO2).

    If the tap water and tank water pH is significantly different (when accurate), or the tank water pH is rising over a few days, you should determine the cause just so you know. The pH, along with nitrate, should remain stable in an aquarium once it (the pH) has settled. Either value changing can mean an issue.
     
  7. Flossybean

    Flossybean New Member

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    Yes it has gone up because it was 7.2 , I'll re-test my tap water, thanks
     
  8. Flossybean

    Flossybean New Member

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    So i let it stand a while then tested it and it's 7.8 out of the tap , it used to be 7.2 , i wonder if the water board are doing something different?
     
  9. Byron

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    It is possible that water parameters can change, depending upon the source of your municipal water. But I would first think it might be the CO2 issue I detailed previously. If you do not outgas any CO2, the test will be lower than the pH actually is because CO2 produces carbonic acid which lowers pH. Removing the CO2 (out-gassing) by letting a glass of water sit 24 hours or very briskly agitating it will result in a more accurate test result. That may bee what is happening here. And obviously, CO2 in the water can vary from time to time depending again upon the source and travelling distance.

    You should also confirm the GH (general or total hardness) and KH (carbonate hardness or Alkalinity) of the source (tap) water. The water authority may have these posted on their website. The pH is connected to these two and knowing the GH and KH will tell us more about possible fluctuations.
     
  10. Flossybean

    Flossybean New Member

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    Ah i haven't let it sit long enough then. My kh is 6 and gh is 12 if that's any help
     
  11. The Lumpfish Guy

    The Lumpfish Guy Fish Fanatic

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    His pH has gone up, from 7.2 to 8... Carbonic Acid, is an Acid.... going from a pH of 7 to 8 means the water is more Alkaline.
     
  12. Byron

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    If these numbers are in degrees GH/KH (as opposed to ppm, mg/l, or whatever) this would match a higher pH so that makes sense. CO2 is likely the factor here, but your later test after out-gassing will confirm.
     
  13. Flossybean

    Flossybean New Member

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    Ok thank you :)
     
  14. Byron

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    I think we're getting tangled up. The lower pH 7.2 was tap water that had not been out-gassed, and this result would seem to be inaccurate. The later higher pH of 7.8 likely represents the more accurate test result because the CO2 was out-gassed prior to this test (if that was the case). The pH around 8 in the tank bears this out, as there is no need to out-gas CO2 for aquarium water.
     
  15. The Lumpfish Guy

    The Lumpfish Guy Fish Fanatic

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    But the original post pH gone up to 8 tap water is also 8. suggests tank and tap is at 8

     

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