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Neon tetras are good with....

Discussion in 'Characins' started by Woody781, Jul 22, 2017.

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  1. Woody781

    Woody781 Fish Fanatic

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    I know they are better off but they were one of my first fish

    A pity the dwarf gourami's are so pretty!! I need some more fish -colourful ones!!


    Funny you say that because thats what I was planning for my tanks.
    New tank: Neons, Cories,.......
    34L tank: Betta and maybe Kuhli Loaches?

    Why is a honey gourami any different??
    What would you put with the neons??

     
  2. Woody781

    Woody781 Fish Fanatic

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  3. essjay

    essjay Member

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    The problem with dwarf gouramis of any colour is dwarf gourami disease, also called dwarf gourami iridovirus. It is incurable, and a lot of dwarf gouramis are already infected by the time they arrive at the shop. The only way to be sure you get disease free dwarf gouramis is to buy them from a reputable breeder rather than a shop. If you can find a breeder, that is.

    Honey gouramis are a different species. There is a red colour morph of honeys, sometimes labelled as red robin gouramis, but they are very difficult to sex, and I wouldn't have 2 males unless the tank was large enough for 2 territories - and a 60 cm tank isn't big enough. The only indicator is the fin shape, and it is only an indicator not a definite way to tell the difference. In males, the dorsal and anal fins tend to be longer and more pointed than in females. But young males won't have finished growing their fins yet and can be mistaken for females - and fish in shops are babies or juveniles.


    In the past I had a 125 litre tank which had green neon tetras (a close relative of neons, and they are also blue despite the name) ember tetras (deep orange red) and Microdevario kubotai, sometimes called neon green rasboras or green tetras (green). Fish in shops usually look washed out due to stress - ember tetras look pale orange and the Microdevario look grey with a hint of green.
    In tanks this size I prefer lots of small fish rather than have a 'centrepiece' fish, but that is purely personal taste. If you do want a centrepiece fish I would look at fish that grow no bigger than 5 cm (2 inches)


    I don't like to suggest too many fish because I know that a lot of species aren't available in Australia.
     
  4. Byron

    Byron Member

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    Agree with essjay's posts. I would just add that you have to keep temperature in mind with neons; they are cooler water tropical fish, not warmer water. "Tropical" fish is a term that covers hundreds of species, and they do not share the same temperature requirements, just as they do not share the same environmental needs or water parameters. Building a community tank, which is what we term an aquarium containing more than one species, requires considerable thought, and temperature, aquascaping and water flow are just three of those factors to consider.

    Neons like it on the cooler side of "tropical," so no higher than 75-76 F. Gourami have been mentioned in this thread, and aside from the real issues essjay mentioned they are generally warmer water fish. Cories like it cooler too, generally, so you won't have problems there with neons.

    The neons are filling the existing small tank, so I wold not suggest acquiring any new fish until the larger tank is acquired, set up, cycled (plants can do this) and ready.

    You mentioned a Betta in the smaller tank when the neons are moved ouot, that is OK. But not with Kuhli Loaches. A Betta probably wouldn't appreciate the nocturnal activities of the loaches.

    Byron.
     
  5. Woody781

    Woody781 Fish Fanatic

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    I might've asked this before but would you put cories with kuhli's? Or the other way around? (not in the 34L tank and not quite yet, just asking). I've been trying to do research on it and some said yes it's ok and some said never, too aggressive with one another
     
    #50 Woody781, Jul 30, 2017
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2017
  6. Byron

    Byron Member

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    I personally would not combined loaches with cories in general. I'm not suggesting this is always going to cause serious issues, it won't; it is probably more of an aesthetic thing with me, though there are reasons. These fish are shoaling, and with cories especially, the more there are the happier they will be; in their habitats they live in shoals of hundreds of the species, so if one wants cories, having as many as you can will always be better for the fish, rather than having fewer and including other substrate species. Similar in reverse.
     
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  7. Woody781

    Woody781 Fish Fanatic

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    Just a question: how much would you pay off eBay/gumtree for a 90L tank? It's on there for $70
     
  8. Woody781

    Woody781 Fish Fanatic

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    I did my first water test today. It was fun to do a bit of science and also check it out for myself.

    PH: 7.6
    Ammonia: 0 ppm
    Nitrite: 0 ppm
    Nitrate: 0 ppm
     
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  9. Woody781

    Woody781 Fish Fanatic

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    Would neon tetras and a Bolivian Ram go ok together in a 90L tank? If so would you just put 1 BRam in??
     
  10. Byron

    Byron Member

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    Yes to both questions. Keep in mind that both the ram and the neons are lower-level fish. I've had Bolivians twice over the years, and they do not go the surface even to feed; they are substrate fish, and eat sinking foods like the pellets, disks, tabs you feed cories. They need sand, as they sift it through their mouths and gills much like cories. They are very peaceful, especially for a cichlid, and in my view one of the nicest cichlids for a community tank. Water quality is important though, so it is best added to an established aquarium. My male died last year, in his ninth year, which is pretty good for a fish expected to live 4-5 years.

    Established is different from cycled; once a tank has cycled, it then begins to develop biologically over the next couple of months or so. An established tank will be less likely to have water chemistry issues, as thee chemistry and biology will have matured and be stable. Regular (weekly) partial water changes of 50% of the tank help to keep this stability.

    Byron.
     
  11. Woody781

    Woody781 Fish Fanatic

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    Wow that's a long time for a fish to live!! I can put sand in, never done that but hey why not!! What other fish would suit a Bolivian Ram that live up the top. Also for future reference if you were moving house how would you transport fish (I bet they wouldn't li

    QUOTE="Byron, post: 3772413, member: 49218"]Established is different from cycled; once a tank has cycled, it then begins to develop biologically over the next couple of months or so. An established tank will be less likely to have water chemistry issues, as thee chemistry and biology will have matured and be stable. Regular (weekly) partial water changes of 50% of the tank help to keep this stability.

    Byron.[/QUOTE]
    Well ok. The tank I just got didn't have any of the ceramic noodles in so it will be a while until a Bolivian will be able to come into this tank. Are they quite sensitive? It seems like it. What do you think of these submersible lights? The light is flickering in the tank I bought but pet shop hasn't got the light. The tank name is Oblong
     

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  12. Byron

    Byron Member

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    I strongly recommend sand as the substrate in any freshwater aquarium. For one thing, some fish need sand (cories, loaches, some cichlids come to mind). For another, it always looks natural, because...well, it is natural. Sand is the substrate frequently found in tropical streams and creeks (sometimes med instead). Just do not get white, this is not good for fish. I use play sand as it is inexpensive, very safe (not rough) and looks natural.

    Hatchetfish, some pencilfish, some of the smaller tetras would work with Bolivian Ram and neon tetras. Keeping in mind the tank size here.

    Moving with fish is not at all easy, believe me; I moved house in 2000 and it was a big job, with three large tanks and about 300 fish. A single smaller tank would be easy to manage.

    I've no experience with submersible lighting...frankly, I would never consider it. Light in the water must be a serious issue for fish... .
     
  13. Woody781

    Woody781 Fish Fanatic

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    Good to keep that in mind about the substrate. Do Bettas mind what substrate they have??

    Hatchetfish look like they are cool fish. How many would you put in a 90L tank? I've only got 9 neons in my 34L tank at the moment. I plan to move them to the 90L once it's cycled and settled. I would love to get 2 or 3 kuhli loaches and cories too -possibly 5 maybe. 1 Bolivian Ram later on. Would they all work together? I could be getting carried away but I enjoy looking after fish and I can't wait to get more (but I have to wait at this point). I don't want to overcrowd or stress out fish unecessarily though. I've seen some of the pencil fish in store and some of them do look cool.

    I know I'll probably have to move in February but I'll ask again then.

    I'll keep trying to source the light or try to fit a different one. Thanks for your help Byron!! It's great to get advice especially when I am just starting out and don't know a lot about tanks or fish (although I'm trying to learn) or learning who to trust (not always trust shop keepers, they are there to sell).
     
    #58 Woody781, Aug 8, 2017
    Last edited: Aug 8, 2017
  14. Byron

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    No. I would still use sand myself, but gravel could work.

    Hatchets, depending upon species (those in Carnegiella are smaller, those in Thoracocharax and Gasteropelecus a bit larger and tend to stay below the surface whereas Carnegiella are at the surface), 9-10 for Carnegiella species and 7 minimum for either of the other two genera. Given the tank size and other fish here, I would stay with Carnegiella species, like the Marble (Carnegiella strigata) in a group of 9-10. I don't know the dimensions of the 90 liter tank, I am assuming the length is around 30 inches/75 cm?

    I wouldn't mix loaches and cories. Not because of any aggressive problems, but more because they occupy the same area (substrate) and they should be in groups, the more the better, and it is better to have a group of say 10 cories rather than 5 cories with 5-6 kuhlii loaches.

    With pencilfish, be careful of the species. The most commonly seen is Nannostomus beckfordi (goes under various common names) and this species is feisty; it does not appreciate any fish near thee surface, so hatchets are out, and I have had this pencil go after otos when they got too close to the surface on plant leaves. N. trifasciatus did the same. The species like Nannostomus eques, N. marginatus or N. morteenthaleri are very peaceful.
     
  15. Woody781

    Woody781 Fish Fanatic

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    Is this Neon tetra sick? It has a white bubble like growth on the side of its mouth
     

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