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Lighting question

Discussion in 'Lighting, CO2, Ferts & Flow' started by Tyler_Fishman, Aug 10, 2017.

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  1. Tyler_Fishman

    Tyler_Fishman Fish Crazy

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    I have two 5000k LED bulbs together that hangs above my plants and a nano aquarium setup, combined do they give of 10000k's? Im not sure how it works, questions would help

     
  2. MrFishMan

    MrFishMan New Member

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    I'm pretty sure they do, because 2 times the power but I am not sure about that!
     
  3. Byron

    Byron Member

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    The "K" number is the colour temperature of the light emitted by the tube (or bulb or LED diodes) expressed as degrees Kelvin. So more than one source (tube, bulb, diode) rated 5000K will produce light at 5000K regardless of the number. Kelvin has no relationship to intensity, and is not cumulative.

    The Kelvin number is the colour of the light. The lower the number, the more red wavelengths and less blue, producing what we term "warm" light; the higher the number, the more blue and less red, producing "cool" light. When you get up to 10,000K and above, the light is extremely blue, with very little red. This is ideal for marine tanks because blue light penetrates water better and corals have evolved to need this. Freshwater plants need blue but also red to drive photosynthesis, and more red than blue, so the 5000K is much better light. Mid-day sun is somewhere around 6000K, which is why the "daylight" tubes/bulbs with 6500K are so good for planted tanks--there is high red, blue and green, though how the tube is manufactured can affect the quality.

    Byron.
     
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