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Help identify these plants please.

Discussion in 'Plants Index' started by Jordan_Deus, Nov 8, 2017.

  1. Thekobokid

    Thekobokid New Member

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    The bulb is one of the species aponogeton
    I Agree Its An Aponogetonn

     
  2. Jordan_Deus

    Jordan_Deus Fish Fanatic

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    Thank you for all the replies! I understand the biggest contenders are Barclaya longifolia and Aponogeton sp. I looked up pictures of Barclaya longifolia and it seems similar except that the leaves are slightly wavier (if that makes sense) and straight whilst the leave on the plant in question have a curl to them. I'm of the opinion that at this stage, the best way to find out, is to wait for the plant to send out shoots to the top of the aquarium, and eventually flower.

    In any case you've helped me narrow down the options, and in either case this is a plant I'd like to keep.

    Thanks for the help!

    Jordan


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  3. Jordan_Deus

    Jordan_Deus Fish Fanatic

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    This plant has continued to grow at an alarming rate of about a leaf (sometimes two) per day. I think it looks very similar to aponogeton crispus. I may have to rethink it's placement, right now it makes a nice focal point but if it is aponogeton crispus it's going to get much larger than it is now.
    [​IMG]

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  4. Byron

    Byron Member

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    Here we go again. Now with this photo, I am back to my initial suggestion...this is likely an Echinodorus species. I have one in my 70g, but cannot remember the name they gave it. The "bulb" is the rhizome, which can be quite substantial in these plants. Mine has pushed itself above the sand.
     
  5. Jordan_Deus

    Jordan_Deus Fish Fanatic

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    Well, I guess I really need to wait and see if it flowers.

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  6. Byron

    Byron Member

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    That would confirm whichever, but of course flowering from any of the species we suggested is next to impossible. Aponogeton crispus is the more likely to flower, but now that the leaves are growing better I would even go out on a limb and say this is definitely not that species. It is not looking at all like the Barclaya either.

    Echinodorus sp., flowering in an aquarium when grown permanently submersed is so rare as to be a non-event. My E. griesbachii ("bleherae" form) have never flowered though up to five inflorescences at the same time from each plant is not unusual.

    My E. major has flowered, twice now in 7 years, but then this species is unique among Echinodorus in being permanently submersed and never emersed in the habitat. The other species are true bog or marsh plants that will adapt well to permanently submersed cultivation without flowers. Adventitious plants have also developed after flowering, contrary to what Rataj (2004) suggests in his book.
     
  7. Jordan_Deus

    Jordan_Deus Fish Fanatic

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    If that's the case I'll be able to confirm whether it's a Echinodurus or not on Thursday. The reason I'll be able to confirm is that I'm adding three Bristlenose pleco to the tank on Thursday. They are well known for eating sword plants, or so I hear.

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