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Help identify these plants please.

Discussion in 'Plants Index' started by Jordan_Deus, Nov 8, 2017.

  1. Jordan_Deus

    Jordan_Deus Fish Fanatic

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    So I bought these two plants yesterday and one was advertised as an aquarium lily but now I'm not so sure about that anymore. The other one I simply have no idea what it's called.
    The image of the plant in the sand is supposed to be a sort of aquarium lily, it simply doesn't look like any picture of an aquarium lily on the internet.

    If anyone can identify these two plants that'll be fantastic!

    Thanks,
    Jordan

    Edit: The bag with the rock in it is only there to weigh down the wood until it's waterlogged.

    [​IMG][​IMG]

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  2. Byron

    Byron Member

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    The first photo may be an Echinodorus species, commonly referred to as Amazon swords. The taxonomy of this genus is very confused, and there are now a great many varieties artificially cultivated from natural species that were probably incorrectly classified in the first place. But the leaf veins, the rosette form and what appears to be a rhizome in the substrate would all apply to Echinodorus. I had a plant that initially had leaves almost flat on the substrate, it is now growing much more vertical, but I cannot remember what the tag name was.

    The second plant, presumably the mass of runners in the wood branch, I am not sure of; I have had no luck at all with any of the "carpeting" plants which this may be one of, or something similar.
     
  3. Demeter32

    Demeter32 Member

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    The carpeting plant looks similar to dwarf baby tears, but there are several plants that look like that from afar. Can you get some closer pictures of it?

    Most carpeting plants need high lighting and a good liquid fertilizer. It is possible to get them to grow on driftwood, but they do far better in fine substrates.
     
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  4. Jordan_Deus

    Jordan_Deus Fish Fanatic

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    Not an Amazon sword, the black thing protruding from the surface is a bulb.

    Will add a few more pictures in a minute.
     
  5. Jordan_Deus

    Jordan_Deus Fish Fanatic

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    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]

    Sent from my MX4 using Tapatalk

    Edit: Lower lighting atm as I turned on one of the 4 lights for the picture, the 8 hour photo period I supply my plants with is over for today.
     
  6. Demeter32

    Demeter32 Member

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    I do feel that the larger plant is a sword of some variety. They can appear to have a "bulb" which is the base of the plant but the roots often are growing above the "bulb" part. White roots, the crown and the types of leaves look like swords. Give it a month or two and I bet it will start looking more like a sword of some sort.

    The carpet plant is probably DBT. Ask google and compare your plant to photos online. It could be monte carlo but I say DBT.
     
  7. Jordan_Deus

    Jordan_Deus Fish Fanatic

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    I'll compare images on google in a moment. I have to disagree with you on the amazon sword part, the bottom is a bulb without a doubt, I planted it yesterday so tomorrow I'll pull it out of the tank and show you guys a picture of the bulb. The closest image I found on the internet was that of an Aponogeton Natans. Could this be correct?
     
  8. Jordan_Deus

    Jordan_Deus Fish Fanatic

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    It would seem the plant on the wood is DBT, I was told in the store that it can thrive without CO2 or very strong lighting. Is this correct?
     
  9. Demeter32

    Demeter32 Member

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    Judging from how poorly my DBT has been doing what with it's very slow growth, it may live but not thrive w/o CO2. I kept my plants in low-medium and it has all but died. The little clump I managed to find and place in a high-light tank is doing better but not amazing. It just seems to grow slowly for me.

    As for the other plant, all I can say is give it time. Normal aponogetons have thin stems and then the leaf blade. I suppose it could be what you've said but I'm not sure.
     
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  10. Byron

    Byron Member

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    I am beginning to doubt my initial suggestion (sword) from the latest photo but still not certain. The photo of the "bulb" may help us pin this plant down. There is a "lily" plant that I think I have seen that could be this one, but I can't find it now. I went through Kasselmann without luck.
     
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  11. drewzaun

    drewzaun New Member

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    The bulb plant does look like an apongeton to me, though I had a nattans and the leaves were more crinkly and grew straight up.

    I’ll tell you if it is, mine grew at a ridiculous pace. The leaf shape made it hard to trim and look good and it was taking over my tank so I pulled it out.


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  12. Jordan_Deus

    Jordan_Deus Fish Fanatic

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    Here are a few more pictures of the bulb. [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]

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    #12 Jordan_Deus, Nov 9, 2017
    Last edited: Nov 9, 2017
  13. Byron

    Byron Member

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    I may have it now. The plant I was picturing in my mind and couldn't find before was Barclaya longifolia. There is the green form (which would be what you have if this is the species) and a red form. This plant has a tuberous or fleshy rhizome (which is what I see in the latest photos), the leaves arise in a rosette (as here), and the margin is undulate (as here). I won't insist on this either, but it is a prime contender.

    Byron.
     
  14. drewzaun

    drewzaun New Member

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    Is the only difference the color? I have the red form, the leaves are about 6 inches long now, but the thin stem is only 3/4cof an inch to an inch, whereas the op’s plant has a longer stem portion.

    The bulb looks very similar though. My apongeton bulb was more like my crinum, very onion like.


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  15. Byron

    Byron Member

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    According to Kasselmann [Aquarium Plants, Dr. Christel Kasselmann, Krieger Publishing, 2003, English translation edition] The single species occurs in a red and green form which she terms cultivars; aside from colour, the green form she says "remains a little smaller."

    On the Aponogeton, all species have a tuber (one has a thin rhizome); I have two or three species and they all have the tuber. My red Tiger Lotus has the same sort of tuber. The roots are much thinner than those in the photos above, whether or not that is significant I don't know.
     

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