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HELP 911 - RED SPOT - FISH AND SHRIMP DYING

Discussion in 'Tropical Fish Emergencies' started by rockmissjess, Apr 20, 2017.

  1. rockmissjess

    rockmissjess New Member

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    After having the bettas in there for awhile and watching them swim... they seem to be slower than normal.. i dont think the aquaquel plus has been doing very good with the ammonia.. im going to do a 90% water change tomorrow and when im in town im going to pick up prime, stability and clairity by seachem going to see if that maintains stable levels as it seems what im using now is not helping the ammonia situation in anyway.. I appreciate everyones help. and for the suggestion for prime.. i think its definitely worth a try... as i read in some reviews of prime.. prime has helped where others have not.. no matter what they claim to do.
     
  2. DutchMuch

    DutchMuch Fishaholic

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    warning i dont sugarcoat my comments May seem Rude
  3. rockmissjess

    rockmissjess New Member

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  4. DutchMuch

    DutchMuch Fishaholic

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    Let me type it out again;
    Answer nicks questions or we are at a stopping point in regards to helping you.
     
  5. DutchMuch

    DutchMuch Fishaholic

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  6. rockmissjess

    rockmissjess New Member

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    Well i think i figured out a major issue... i did recently get 10 new live tall amazon swords for all three of my aquariums... i havent lost fish in the other aquariums but i did check each of the others... and i noticed all the fish have one or two little white dots on them (ich) looks like ill be using a ich treatment on all the tanks.. is it possible that the plants brought in ich and infected all the tanks?
     
  7. DutchMuch

    DutchMuch Fishaholic

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    Ich is caused by bad water quality, not plant transportation. we cant help you if you don't help us by answering the questions we give you.
     
  8. StevenF

    StevenF Member

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    Actually ICH is caused by a parasite that is either free floating int the water or has settled onto things like plants. I am not aware of any report showing water quality having any effect on it Adding plants could have easily carried the parasite into the tanks. The best way of preventing this when adding future plants is to keep the plant quarintined for about 3 to 4 weeks in a separate container without fish or snails. ICH needs animals to reproduce. Without fish or snails they will be die out in about 2 weeks at room temperature or about 1 week at elevated temperature (80 to 90F).

    for treating your existing simply increasing your existing tank temperature as high as possible without harming the fish will help by shortening the parasites life cycle. Apparently a small amount of salt in the water will also help. fine particle filters in your filter will also help filter out the free swimming parasites. A UV serializer should also kill the free floating parasites before they can infect fish or die. More frequent watee changes would also help by physically removing the parasite and would reduce ammonia levels.These are the most common steps taken from what I have read and they can all be done at the same time. I have not seen it myself.
     
  9. DutchMuch

    DutchMuch Fishaholic

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    And if you kept up with WC's they wouldn't be there. (as much, you get my point)
    Ich is so widespread that many experts feel that it is present in the environment of most aquariums, especially in larger holding tanks, rearing ponds of breeders, collectors, and wholesalers. In fact, just about every aquarium fish will come into contact with this protozoan at several times in its life. Because it is so widespread, most fish have developed a good immune response against the disease to allow them to fight off the protozoan infection before it ever causes any symptoms. Captive fish that develop ich usually get the disease when their immune systems are not functioning as well as they should be because of stress. We know that stress lowers the immune response and when fish are stressed that is when ich is most prevalent.

    There are many causes of stress in a fish's life, many of which can be made worse or better by the owner. Water temperature, water quality, tank inhabitants, improper diet, and a variety of other factors all contribute to stress, but one of the most severe causes of stress occurs during shipping and handling of a new fish. Whether coming from the wild or farm-raised, the handling and shipping of the fish from their origin to a wholesaler, then to a retailer, and finally to your home is extremely stressful. With the widespread prevalence of ich, it is no wonder that many newly purchased fish are affected.
    BTW here is the ich lifecycle:
    The life cycle of Ichthyophthirius is complicated but very important in understanding the treatment and prevention of ich. Once the ich protozoan attaches to the side of the fish, it begins feeding on the skin and tissue causing irritation. The fish's body begins to wall off the parasite to try to limit its damage. The protozoan continues to move around in the cyst feeding and growing, while the body continues to further encapsulate and wall it off. This encapsulation by the body is one of the reasons that ich is so difficult to treat during this stage of the disease because medications cannot penetrate through the wall of the cyst to reach the ich parasite. During this stage, the ich protozoan is called a trophozoite. The trophozoite eventually matures and is termed a "trophont." It will burst through the cyst wall and then fall to the bottom of the aquarium. It then begins to divide into hundreds of new ich-infecting units called tomites. This stage is very temperature-dependent within its capsule, with the fastest replications occurring at warmer temperatures near 78-80°F. At optimum temperatures, the replication will be completed in about 8 hours. At lower temperatures, the replication takes longer making the treatment time for eradication much longer.

    Once the replication is complete, the trophont bursts and releases the newly-formed tomites into the water. The tomites are motile and swim around the tank searching for a fish to attach to. Once they attach to a fish, the cycle will start over again. It is during this stage that ich is most susceptible to treatment. Many of the available medications will kill the tomites, thereby stopping the cycle of ich in your tank. It should be noted that these tomites will only survive for 48 hours, if they do not find a fish to attach to. These tomites will also attach to plants, filter material, etc. So if you move a plant from an infected tank into a clean tank, you have just infected the clean tank with ich. Depending on the water temperature, the whole cycle can take from 4 days to several weeks.
     

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