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Garlic Guard or garlic extract?

Discussion in 'Tropical Fish Emergencies' started by Jim Sinclair, Oct 24, 2018.

  1. Jim Sinclair

    Jim Sinclair New Member

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    Is there anything special about Garlic Guard that makes it better than plain garlic extract (obviously nothing with alcohol or other additives), or homemade liquid garlic?

    I have a floppy baby goldfish that I've posted about in my intro thread in the welcome section. Wondering if the problem might be constipation. Offered a mashed pea last night (blanched and peeled), but the fish didn't eat it. Soaking peas in Garlic Guard was suggested. I'd like to know if I need to buy the name brand product, or if something I can buy for less cost at a supermarket would work just as well?

     
  2. Valerie Adams

    Valerie Adams Fish Fanatic

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    Hey Jim, if it was me I would just get a head of garlic and mince up a clove to get some juices. That seems like the most natural and cheap way to go. Though I haven't done it for fish so maybe someone else has more insight. @SeaAngel @SeaGypsy13 have used garlic before I think
     
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  3. midna

    midna New Member

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    i've read that fresh garlic's beneficial properties appear 15 minutes after being chopped. i don't think old garlic (storebought juice or garlicguard) would have the same immunity benefits as freshly chopped garlic. i personally just take a couple tiny pieces of freshly chopped garlic, soak it in a bit of tank water for about 10 minutes, then add whatever frozen food i'm feeding and let that soak for a total of 15-20 minutes. we use fresh garlic in our dinners all the time so it's no big deal.
     
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  4. Jim Sinclair

    Jim Sinclair New Member

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    That does sound like it would be best for immunity benefits. But what I'm trying to use garlic for is to convince the fish to eat some peas to alleviate suspected constipation. Doe soaking freshly chopped garlic in tank water, and soaking food in the same water, confer the same appetite-stimulating effects as using Garlic Guard?
     
  5. midna

    midna New Member

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    oh yeah, true. it would be the same, i think. just go for whatever is easiest for you. they just love the smell/taste of garlic.
     
  6. Jim Sinclair

    Jim Sinclair New Member

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    I just got home with groceries, including some organic garlic. I now have groceries to put away, water changes to do, and need to research Epsom salt baths. For now, I've got three blanched shelled peas in an empty baby food jar soaking in a very dense solution of clean conditioned water and garlic powder. I will figure out what to do with the fresh garlic cloves a little later. Thanks for the suggestion about soaking them! This gave me the idea, at least as an initial quick measure, of soaking peas in garlic powder solution until I have time to do something else.
     
  7. SeaAngel

    SeaAngel Fish Fanatic

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    Fresh garlic is absolutely fine to use, Jim. Hope it works!
     
  8. SeaAngel

    SeaAngel Fish Fanatic

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    Have you done an Epsom salt bath before? I usually do 1 tvOS per gallon of dechlorinated water for 15 - 20 mins. With a baby I would do 1 tsp to a gallon for 5 mins at first to see how he does.
     
  9. Jim Sinclair

    Jim Sinclair New Member

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    I have, but a long time ago, with a very bloated adult fish (who turned out to have polycystic kidney disease, so the Epsom salt didn't help).

    I just gave Floppy a 7 minute Epsom salt bath. It didn't seem any different in there than in the hospital tank: no apparent agitation, also no improvement in swimming or staying upright. Floppy then had a rinse cycle in a smaller container with plain conditioned water to rinse off Epsom salt residue before returning to the hospital tank. While Floppy was in the bath I did a water change in the hospital tank. Now floppy is back in the hospital tank, lying on its side on the floor again.
     
  10. midna

    midna New Member

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    just so you know, you don't necessarily need to buy organic garlic, since it has a protective outer layer. i don't think they use much pesticides on garlic anyway. we usually buy organic produce but not when it comes to garlic. just in case you wanna save a little $$ in the future! ;) i hope your fishy gets better :(
     
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  11. SeaAngel

    SeaAngel Fish Fanatic

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    You can do Epsom salt baths several times a day. Not sure if one time would really help that much. Did he eat the garlic/pea? I’m sure rooting for that little guy.
     
  12. NickAu

    NickAu Member
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    Have you tried fasting your fish?

    Why feed peas?

    Daphnia are known to act as a mild laxative and a digestive aid

    Epsom Salt is magnesium sulfate, which you may know as a saline (salt) laxative or a remedy to reduce swelling for humans. It is easily found nearly anywhere, often in first aid aisles and even in gas stations! Please note that humans use Epsom as a means to relax when infused into bathwater, so sometimes it has dyes or is scented. Please only use unscented, undyed Epsom when medicating your fish!

    What's Epsom do?:
    Epsom has a bunch of uses. Not surprisingly, its uses in fish are very similar to its uses in humans. When used properly in fish, it can act as a laxative as well as a means to reduce swelling. If used correctly in fish that have swim bladder disorder (SBD), epsom can help them swim better and even be able to sink.

    What does this mean for my fish?:
    These qualities mean you can help a bloated or constipated fish expel backed up waste and feel good again, as well as reduce swelling that may be caused by disease or infection. The swelling Epsom can assist with includes: popeye, external wound infection swelling, and in some cases relieve pressure from dropsy.

    How much of this salt per gallon do I use?:
    For Epsom, you use 1 TABLEspoon (TBSP) per gallon of water. This is three TEAspoons (TSP).

    How long does the betta stay in this mixture?:
    In Epsom, the betta should stay in for 10-15 minutes, with 10 being less severe need and 15 being a more severe need. Never exceed this time!

    How to prepare (any) dip for your fish:

    Prepping for the dip is the same for either salt type. You will need:
    • a clean fish-only 1 gallon container
    • a smaller container
    • Water conditioner
    • a measuring spoon
    • thermometer
    • net
    • your undivided attention!
    • watch/timer/alarm
    • salt per your needs


    Here's what you need to do:
    1. Fill your gallon container very fully with clean, treated water. Make sure the water is the same temperature as the water the fish came from in its tank via the thermometer. This prevents temperature shock.
    2. Add the salt per recommendation and stir it until it is fully dissolved.
    3. Get a second container with 1/4 salted water like your 1 gallon tank, and the rest (3/4) with tank water (this is the "reviving station").
    4. Carefully get your fish from its home and gently put it into the water. You must make sure that the fish does not pass out! You can tell if a fish has conked out if it is no longer breathing (look at its gills, by the eyes) or if it lists to the side and becomes still. It may knock out due to the sudden change in salinity (saltiness) of the water, but can be revived.
    5. *If the fish passes out or becomes extremely stressed, remove it! Carefully but hastily put the fish into your reviving station to revive. Then, put it into its home again and try the dip another time.
    6. If the fish is not super stressed and does not pass out, be very attentive during the recommended time in the dip as the fish may jump due to discomfort or stress. Pay close attention to how long the fish has been in the dip and do not exceed the time!
    7. Once the fish is finished, put it into the reviving station to adjust back to more normal water parameters. Then, without pouring the salty water into your tank, put the fish back into its home to recover.

    How long should my fish be left to acclimate before going back into its tank in this mixture?:
    Acclimate your fish (see below) for 2-5 minutes before going back to avoid shock.
     
  13. SeaAngel

    SeaAngel Fish Fanatic

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    Interesting. I have never used a reviving tank.
     
  14. NickAu

    NickAu Member
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    Hi
    Save that for future reference.

    Interesting, I have never had a fish that suffered from constipation.

    My advice would be feed less processed dry food and more live and frozen or even canned food

    Ocean Free has a great range.
    [​IMG]
     
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  15. Colin_T

    Colin_T Member

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    Garlic and onion are not tolerated by most animals including fish and some people. Using garlic to treat fish might not end well. Using garlic to season baked fish, that's another story :)

    As Nick suggested, feed a variety of food including live and frozen, and fast the fish one day a week and they should never get constipated, assuming that's what the problem is.
     
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