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Dwarf Gourami Death

Discussion in 'Gouramis and Anabantoids' started by Marto666, Sep 19, 2011.

  1. Marto666

    Marto666 Member

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    My 2 Dwarf Gourami (6 months old) have developed what can only be described as a blister with a red sore in the middle on the left side of the body between the eye and fin.

    One perished last night after it kept falling to the bottom and trying to swim back to the surface. The other seems very lethargic and just sits on the bottom of a hatchery I had exiled them to. I fear he won’t pull through?

    Anyone seen this before? Is this the infamous Dwarf Gourami disease and what precautions should I be taking? All other fish seem fit as a fiddle.

    Thanks
     
  2. KittyKat

    KittyKat Moderator
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    Yes, these are common symptoms for dwarf goruamis. I recommend increased water changes and a generic anti-bacterial medication.

    My personal opinion is that dwarf gourami disease is an excuse for poor water quality, as dwarf gouramis are very sensitive to water quality and I have not seen any proof that the disease really exists.
     
  3. Marto666

    Marto666 Member

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    Thanks for your reply.

    I 25% water change every 10 days and only completed my last 4 days ago so cant see how this may have caused it as I have been consistant?

    Is it curable?
     
  4. KittyKat

    KittyKat Moderator
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    Depending on the set-up, that's not very much. Also, water changes don't always correspond to water quality. For example, small water changes do not help to "reset" the hormone levels in the water. I *might* be able to make an educated guess at whether it is enough if you post your tank size, stock list (species, numbers age and size), tank and tap (the latter post-dechlorination and after standing for 24 hours) water parameters, description of cleaning regime, photo of tank, short summary log of the tank since it was set up and feeding regime.

    That depends on exactly what it is. If it is a bacterial infection, probably. If it is columnaris, probably. If it's Hexamita, possibly. If one fish has already died, there's a good chance that the other is too far gone to recover or survive medication. Still, you should try medicating just in case it does and because other fish may be infected too. What does the gourami's poo look like?.

    But if you don't fix whatever caused it in the first place, it will only come back or will affect the fish in the long term, which will result in death.
     
  5. Marto666

    Marto666 Member

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    I have asked many times regarding water changes on this forum have been advised that is an adequate amount. I will have to provide those details later when I have more time but my signature has my stock and tank size etc. Just seems odd that I have not changed anything so would not have expected this.

    Their poo was like little strings, they were both absolutely fine and normal before yesterday.

    What kind of medication should I consider?

    I have heard that Dwarf Gourami do tend to get ill easy.
     
  6. KittyKat

    KittyKat Moderator
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    Ah, sorry, didn't see it. That stocking is looking overstocked to me predominantly because of the silver dollars and Bala sharks. The environment is also very stressful for gouramis because of the number of other Anabantoidei that are present in the aquarium. Assuming that the aquarium is less than moderately-heavily to heavily planted, I would expect it to need more regular water changes.

    I can see a *lot* of other problems with it too, but someone probably already pointed them out to you.

    Colour?

    From what I have seen over the years on forums, the vast majority of these cases is the result of poor water quality.
     
  7. Marto666

    Marto666 Member

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    I have had no other problems at all or have been advised of any potential issues regarding my set-up, they all seem pretty chilled. My dollars are full size, they are massive but don’t seem to cause any problems. The sharks are only little, they don’t seem to grow too quickly, I hardly notice them really.

    The poo has been red – same colour as the food.

    Because I am so consistent in water changes, it never really crossed my mind that it could be a water quality issue.
     
  8. KittyKat

    KittyKat Moderator
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    So the list doesn't take up too much space:
    1* black widow tetra - schooling: should be kept in groups of at least 6, or ideally in groups of 10-15+, may bother other fish if in small groups
    4* bleeding heart tetra - schooling
    4* emperor tetra - schooling
    10* penguin tetra - ok
    6* rummynose tetra - ok, would be better in larger group
    2* sunset platy - probably ok, depends on sex
    4* guppies - probably ok, depends on sex
    1* bristlenose pleco - ok
    2* hatchets - schooling, may be easily spooked if kept in groups under 10 (which can result in them hurting themselves)
    1m 3f Betta - might not work in the long term, depends on surface plant cover, not good with gouramis
    3* three-spot (blue) gourami - depends on sex, not good with other gouramis and Bettas
    2* dwarf gourami - depends on sex, not good with other gouramis and Bettas
    2* moonlight gourami - depends on sex, not good with other gouramis and Bettas
    2* pearl gourami - depends on sex, not good with other gouramis and Bettas
    2* Siamese flying fox - Crossocheilus siamensis are best kept in schools, Epalzeorhynchos kalopterus are too aggressive for more than one to be kept in a tank of your size
    2* bottom feeders - get an ID, common plecos can grow to 2 ft long, for example, so wouldn't be suitable for your tank
    5* mollies - probably ok, depends on sex; if you have any male mollies and female guppies, probably not ok: if a male molly breeds with a female guppy, she will usually die during birthing because the hybrid offspring would be too large
    2* Bala sharks - too large (I used to look after some 16" ones in a much larger tank and they looked cramped in there), schooling; will eat smaller fish
    2* silver dollars - schooling

    So probably not internal parasites then… but keep watching this, just in case. There are no red worms sticking out of the bum, are there?

    As I mentioned, water quality is a lot more complicated than just water changes :)
     
  9. Marto666

    Marto666 Member

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    Thanks for the break down, I must be riding my luck looking at your list.

    I don’t have common plecs, I know how large they grow + they poo for England (I know someone who keeps one in a 90l tank...).

    I will add (in my defence) I inherited most of these fish when I bought the tank and would prefer to keep fish in shoals rather than pairs etc.


    Haven’t seen any red worms but I will keep extra vigilant. They both seemed to have lost all appetite so don’t think there will be much more poo coming.

    Could very well be a water quality issue, I cant really think what else it might be. I would be very disappointed if so. Another test is imminent to get to the bottom of this.
     
  10. KittyKat

    KittyKat Moderator
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    If possible (and your tap water pH and hardness is same as for the tank water), can you do a 60-80% water change with warm, dechlorinated water? It might help.

    I prefer eSHa 2000 as a generic anti-bacterial. Out of the rest, other people would be able to advise you better. Be careful though: most medications should not be mixed and are toxic to fish, just not as much as to what they're treating against.
     
  11. PlatyQueen

    PlatyQueen Member

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    Very sad :( It could be ammonia burn. did you cycle your tank before you had the fish? it could also be velvet, but i highly dought THAT is what it was.
     

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