Welcome to Our Community

Wanting to join the rest of our members? Feel free to sign up today.

Dalmation Molly's Eyes

Discussion in 'Tropical Fish Emergencies' started by Pidgecbr600rr, Feb 11, 2006.

  1. Pidgecbr600rr

    Pidgecbr600rr Member

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2005
    Messages:
    79
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Dudley, West Midlands, England
    My one male dalmation molly's eyes seem to be bulging, only noticed just, is this a sign of some disease? he seems happy enough but i'm fairly sure they werent like this a few days ago

    Paul
     
  2. tttnjfttt

    tttnjfttt I have a point, just don't ask me what it is

    Joined:
    May 21, 2005
    Messages:
    2,812
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    my own little world, which is currently in Norther
    It sounds like pop-eye, which can be from a number of causes. Need to know your water stats (ammonia, nitrite, nitrate and pH)

    If your water stats are good, it could be bacterial.

    I am not the author of this information.
    Exophthalmia (a.k.a. Pop-Eye)

    Symptoms:

    Fish with exophthalmia will have eyes that are abnormally enlarged and protrude from their sockets. In severe cases the eyes may actually burst from the socket, leaving the fish eyeless. Eye swelling is caused by a build up of fluids in or behind the eye.


    Cause:

    There can be any number of causes for this condition. Possible causes include poor water quality, bacterial infections, viral infections, eye flukes or other parasitic infestations, or piscine tuberculosis. Even though the fish may recover, the protruding eye may remain that way. This should not adversely affect that fish.


    Treatment:

    Since there are so many possible causes a broad-spectrum antibiotic is recommended, such as Tetracycline, but this treatment cannot obviously guarantee success. Be sure to keep water quality in good condition.
     
  3. Pidgecbr600rr

    Pidgecbr600rr Member

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2005
    Messages:
    79
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Dudley, West Midlands, England
    Ok water stats are looking quite bad, PH is 7, Amonia is 0, nitrates and nitrites are way too high, and i did a 20% water change only yesterday, i've done another 10% today and will do the same as often as possible,

    i'm wondering if this is the reason for the fish eyes being swollen, it also looks like its got chapped lips they are white and rough, i have put him in my floating breeding trap to keep him from being picked on, all my other fish seem fine

    I dont really want to medicate as the above results would indicate that the newly installed fluval filter either 1 isnt coping or 2 is not matured enough, even though i ran it alongside my other one for 2 months before swapping

    Does anyone know much about fluval's? its a fluval 2 plus which i thought was supposed to be very good and was supposed to be for upto 90l and mine is only 70l

    Also i'm getting brown slime on the filter pads, and dark algae on my artifical plants, is there a way to reduce this or could this be a sign of something? i dont have the lights on the tank for more than a few hrs per day really

    Thanks

    Paul
     
  4. tttnjfttt

    tttnjfttt I have a point, just don't ask me what it is

    Joined:
    May 21, 2005
    Messages:
    2,812
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    my own little world, which is currently in Norther
    With some pop-eye, you can try to take a wait and see approach as you improve your water quality. However, I am very concerned about the white, chapt lips. This is a disease known as mouth fungus, which is actually a bacterial infection called columnaris. This disease is contagious and lethal. (this could also be the cause of the pop-eye) You will need to medicate. I know you are from the UK, but in the US there are antibacterial meds out there that do not harm the filter.

    I am not the writer of this information.
    Columnaris (mouth rot, mouth fungus, 'flex')

    Symptoms

    Early signs of this disease are greyish-white marks or patches around the mouth, or on the body or fins of the fish. These may appear thread-like, particularly around the mouth, giving rise to the incorrect name of 'mouth fungus'. Fins will deteriorate and sores may appear on the body. The gills may be affected, giving rise to bacterial gill disease. It may cause 'shimmying' behaviour in fishes like livebearers.
    Causes

    The disease is caused by the bacteria Flavobacterium colmnare, formerly known as Flexibacter columnaris. It has been refered to as 'mouth fungus' (even though the cause is bacterial), due to the whitish strands which may appear fungus-like. These are Gram-negative, rod shaped bacteria, which move by gliding across a surface.

    As with many bacterial diseases, poor water quality is a major factor in triggering the disease. Sudden changes in conditions may also trigger it, and the disease is common in newly imported fish.
    Possible cures

    Anti-bacterial medications should cure this disease if used promptly. At later stages, the bacteria may invade internal organs, in which case only antibiotics may be effective. Several strains exist which vary in their virulence (how 'aggressively' they cause disease)..
     

Share This Page