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Cleanup Crew Not Eating Algae

Discussion in 'Algae Removal' started by andy36yr19, Jan 31, 2019.

  1. andy36yr19

    andy36yr19 New Member

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    I have a fishtank with a big algae issue on my my anubias and the tank has 1 betta, 4 male guppies, 1 male endlers guppy, 8 neon tetras. The plants are anubias, vallisneria, and Amazon sword. The cleanup crew is 3 amano shrimp, 2 shrimp(sold as amano but arent), common pleco, yoyo loaches(I believe they're cleanup. I've been thinking if it's the loaches scaring away the shrimp or something because they're always hiding in between cracks of driftwood. Im also thinking of trading my common pleco to a clown because it's too big for my tank now. I'm also thinking of trading the loaches for some nerite snails maybe. Every now and then they eat algae but not enough. They get half an algae wafer 1 in morning and another in afternoon. Should I cut that ir what else should I do?

     
  2. essjay

    essjay Member

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    No creature will eat all kinds of algae and there are types of algae that nothing will eat. And yoyo loaches are not algae eaters, see the 'diet' section here http://www.seriouslyfish.com/species/botia-almorhae/

    The type of algae that commonly grows on anubias is one of the types that nothing eats, black brush algae. Not even nerite snails.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  3. andy36yr19

    andy36yr19 New Member

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    How do I remove the black brush algae because that is what the algae looks like?
     
  4. essjay

    essjay Member

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    It is very hard to get rid of. You can try to scrub it off but that risks damaging the leaves. Some people say you can use one of the liquid carbon products, overdosing in the tank or spraying it directly onto the leaves. But I will not allow these products anywhere near my tanks as they contain glutaraldehyde, a potent disinfectant, which will end up inside the fish. I'd rather put up with the algae.

    I have found that floating plants work so a large degree as they cut down the light reaching the lower plants. Those like anubias can cope with this, but algae seems to need more light so doesn't grow as badly.
     
  5. Colin_T

    Colin_T Member

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    can you post a picture of the algae so we know what type it is?
     
  6. Byron

    Byron Member

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    Agree with essjay. Algae on plants like Anubias and Java Fern that are slow growing is usually a type of black beard/brush algae. Slow growing plants require less light (and less nutrients) so if the overhead tank light is stronger than what these plants need, algae is inevitable.

    Floating plants are your best solution, if the other plants are doing well with the present light. Reducing the lighting (intensity and duration are separate things) might help the Anubias but harm the other plants that being faster growing require more light (intensity but maybe duration, depending).

    No fish will eat this algae, except two species that both get large and need a group and likely wold not work in your tank. Knowing the tank dimensions would help us advise, but anything under 4 feet in length is not possible.

    Which brings me to the Yo Yo Loach. This is a shoaling fish that musty have a group of five or more. It will be seriously harmed without others of its species. It needs space, a 3-foot tank is absolute minimum but a 4-foot would be better. It does not eat algae.
     
  7. andy36yr19

    andy36yr19 New Member

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    I have a video of the algae here,https://photos.app.goo.gl/bSKPQYqMra3nDYzcA
     
  8. Byron

    Byron Member

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    Yes, that is a form of black brush algae. Likely because of the direct light over the Anubias. Floating plants may solve this. When you see it is not increasing you will know you have dealt with it.

    There are no fish for this tank that will even look at that algae, much less eat it. The light/nutrient balance is the key to control.
     
  9. andy36yr19

    andy36yr19 New Member

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    I've seen online about hydrogen peroxide. What do you feel about that idea?
     
  10. Byron

    Byron Member

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    Not with fish in the tank, never. Every substance added to the water gets inside the fish, into the bloodstream, gills and internal organs. At the very least this stresses the fish, and it may lead to even more serious problems.

    The other thing is that even if you could remove the existing algae, it will only return unless you deal with the cause, which is the imbalance of light/nutrients--or in this case more a matter of too much overhead light for a plant that does not need this much light.
     

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