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Antibiotic treatment for fin rot

Discussion in 'Bettas' started by Barry Grayson, Nov 17, 2018.

  1. Barry Grayson

    Barry Grayson New Member

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    What is the recommended antibiotic and dosage for a male betta splendens with fin rot ?
    Thanks so much


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  2. Colin_T

    Colin_T Member

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    No anti-biotics unless there is red lines running through the fins.

    Fin Rot is caused by poor water quality and this damages the tissue and allows bacteria in. The bacteria cause the red veiny lines in the fins. If the edge of the tail is not red and there are no red lines in the fins, then do a big (75%) water change and gravel clean the substrate each day for a couple of weeks. If the fish is reasonably healthy its fins will heal without any need for medication.

    Make sure any new water is free of chlorine/ chloramine before it is added to the tank.
     
  3. Ash Paws

    Ash Paws Fish Fanatic

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    You can also use aquarium salt, 1 tsp per gallon. Always pre-mix the salt with aquarium water before adding it in. Lower the temp of the water to about 75° F because this will slow down the bacterial growth.
    Do a 75-90% water change once a day, and add the same amount of salt back in.
    Do NOT do this treatment for more than ten days, the betta could get poisoned by the salt.
     
  4. Colin_T

    Colin_T Member

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    That dose of salt is fine for up to 1 month for all species of freshwater fish. However, fish that originate from soft water (Bettas, tetras, gouramis, angelfish) can have kidney problems if they are exposed to salt for too long. One month is the maximum time you want to keep salt with these types of fish.
     
  5. Barry Grayson

    Barry Grayson New Member

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    Thanks guys for these two helpful posts.
    Question: I am trying to cycle this new
    3 1/2g tank with the one suffering betta.
    There is about 3” depth of gravel and an under gravel filter whose output is a very gentle spill over that doesn’t disturb the water much. If I perform 75% water changes daily will this delay the cycling of the tank? Or is the biological aspect of cycling going on in the gravel and the fibe


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  6. Ash Paws

    Ash Paws Fish Fanatic

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    The beneficial bacteria will stay in the filter and gravel. A helpful thing to get is a beneficial bacteria supplement, or to be more exact something like Tetra Safe Start. This creates beneficial bacteria colonies and I always use it after routine water changes.
     
  7. Colin_T

    Colin_T Member

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    Big water changes won't affect the filter bacteria as long as the new water is free of chlorine/ chloramine.

    The filter bacteria live on hard surfaces like glass, gravel filter sponge, etc.
     
  8. Deanasue

    Deanasue Fish Crazy

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    Actually, very little bb lives in the gravel and glass. The biggest portion is going to be in your filter media.
     
  9. Colin_T

    Colin_T Member

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    Undergravel filters use gravel as the filter media. It is covered in bacteria :)
     
  10. NickAu

    NickAu Member
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    Actually no,

    To quote Byron Hoskins.

    The greatest population of bacteria in a healthy balanced aquarium occurs in the substrate, not the filter. The floc or humic compost that collects in the substrate is the host for the biofilms; this is why the substrate in planted tanks should never be disturbed, and many aquarists apply this to non-planted tanks as well.

    In very general terms, aerobic nitrification takes place in the top 1-2 inches of the substrate; anaerobic de-nitrification takes place approximately 2-4 inches down, and anaerobic bacteria producing hydrogen sulfide occurs in substrates deeper than 3-4 inches. In all three cases, it will be deeper in coarse substrates (like pea gravel) and more shallow in finer substrates such as sand. These generalities will also vary with the presence of live plant roots and substrate “diggers” such as snails and worms, since these factors result in more oxygen being made available in the substrate, reducing anaerobic bacteria activity. An oxygen level in the substrate of as little as 1 ppm promotes nitrogen reduction rather than sulfur reduction (hydrogen sulfide)
     
  11. Barry Grayson

    Barry Grayson New Member

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    This is my Betta, recovering from fin rot in his 3 1/2gal tank. Doing 75% water changes daily and he is at least not getting worse. The nitrite level is lower and pH still 7.8 high. Any suggestions as to how best to lower pH?
    Thanks


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  12. NickAu

    NickAu Member
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    Do not mess with the PH, its way to complicated and if anybody tries to tell you its not ignore them because they havent got a clue.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  13. Barry Grayson

    Barry Grayson New Member

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    Nick,
    Thanks once again.
    Should I assume that the pH 7.8
    will drop on its own? I have read that a leaf rich in tanin and or a piece of drift wood will reduce the pH in a gentle way. Any validity to that. What do you recommend? [​IMG]


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  14. Deanasue

    Deanasue Fish Crazy

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    I totally disagree. It’s ok to agree to disagree. Who is Byron Hoskins? I can’t find anything on him.
     
    #14 Deanasue, Nov 18, 2018
    Last edited: Nov 18, 2018
  15. Deanasue

    Deanasue Fish Crazy

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    That’s exactly why underground filters are old school and not as good as other filtration. Your filter media houses more because I’d the movement and oxygen going through it.
     

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