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40g long

Discussion in 'Aquariums' started by Joshua1990, Feb 22, 2019.

  1. Joshua1990

    Joshua1990 New Member

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    I have a 40g long that I plan to start the cycling process soon but I'm already starting the fish type choices now I know for sure I'm getting a school of emerald cords. Now I want to keep all the fish in this 40g tank small schooling fish that are pretty active. Other than tetras and barbs what else could I add?

     
  2. Byron

    Byron Member

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    First we/you need to know your water parameters for the source water, tap water presumably. GH (general or total hardness) and pH are the most important, but it also is useful knowing the KH (carbonate hardness or Alkalinity). If you do not already know these values, you should be able to get them from your municipal water supplier (unless you are on a private well). Check their website, or call them. You/we need the number and their unit of measurement (for GH and KH).

    I assume the emerald cords are emerald cory, Corydoras aeneus? Another common name is Bronze Cory. There is also a larger cory sometimes also called emerald, Corydoras splendens, or sometimes seen as Brochis splendens.
     
  3. eaglesaquarium

    eaglesaquarium Life, Liberty & Pursuit of the perfect fish tank
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    After you've addressed Byron's question regarding water parameters to ensure that your water is suitable for corydoras...


    We always recommend sand for the substrate with cories. Its just the best thing for them, and if they are the 'central' species of this tank, you'll want to ensure the best for them to display their best behaviors.


    Regular play sand from the home improvement store works great for cories (but it is very dusty and requires a bit of rinsing first). Darker is better for the fish... A lot of folks like the look of BLACK sand, but this is usually rather expensive. I found a very suitable black 'sand' for my cories a few years ago - ceramaquartz. The only issue was sourcing it. Its often used in concrete, and comes in a variety of colors. This stuff is VERY safe for cories... It is sold in 50 lb bags normally and is often only available through concrete supply stores. Amazingly, its very clean (very little dust in it)... and 55 lbs should be just enough for a 40 gallon long... though a second bag might be necessary.
     
  4. Byron

    Byron Member

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    I agree on the sand being needed for cories. With one exception, all cory species naturally live over a substrate of either sand or mud, or a mix, and they sift this through their gills so it must be small grain sand and very smooth. Play sand meets these requirements and it is very inexpensive. I changed to sand in all my tanks some years ago and only wish I'd done it sooner. I don't rinse the play sand too much, as it is after all only fine dirt you are rinsing out, and this is not harmful. I usually give four or five rinses. What's left in the sand settles out in a day or two and I've never seen it afterwards.
     
  5. eaglesaquarium

    eaglesaquarium Life, Liberty & Pursuit of the perfect fish tank
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    Agreed Byron. Though, the fine stuff being in the water column did affect my filter. Putting some floss over the intake while the sand settles can prevent that.
     

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