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How Long Can My Chain Eel Stay In This Small Tank?


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#1 YouSillyHumans

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Posted 17 February 2014 - 12:11 AM

How long can my chainlink moray eel stay in my 10 gallon fish tank, the water is R/O he has a home all set up in the rocks, and eats well so everything is fine besides the size of the tank. I understand this tank would be incredibly small for a chainlink moray but mine is a baby, only 7 inches long.

 

The deal is I planned on getting a 55 gallon but I chickened out at the last moment because I wanted an even BIGGER tank and now I want a 75, I plan to house the moray in the 75 gallon but can not afford it yet, How long before my eel gets too big? It is my understanding they get a little over 2 feet full grown in a aquarium.


Edited by YouSillyHumans, 17 February 2014 - 12:14 AM.


#2 EllieJellyEllie

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Posted 17 February 2014 - 12:14 AM

IMO, he is too big now. Get the 75g, cycle it, and put him in there ASAP



#3 YouSillyHumans

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Posted 17 February 2014 - 12:22 AM

IMO, he is too big now. Get the 75g, cycle it, and put him in there ASAP

 

 

I'm talking seriously max amount of time I can get away with for the 10 gallon, he seems perfectly fine and spends most of the time in his cave. Are you absolutely sure it would be detrimental to the health of the fish if he stayed in the 10 gallon any longer? I do not have funds for a 75 and if I buy the 55 he will have to live in that permanently. Which I have read that for this specific eel would be too small.

 

 

I understand he may not be ecstatic but with the limited amount of funds I have to invest in the actual tank I was hoping the hardy eel could tough it out a bit longer since he seems perfectly fine.

 

 

 

I have seen much larger eels housed in small tanks for biology and they seemed perfectly fine.


Edited by YouSillyHumans, 17 February 2014 - 12:25 AM.


#4 EllieJellyEllie

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Posted 17 February 2014 - 12:26 AM

If you can't get the 75g in 1-2 months, I would rehome him. Look on craigslist for a used tank, us in the US find alot of good deals there.

 

I thought I couldnt get a tank for a while, as the initial setup would be about $300, but I looked on craigslist and got a full fishtank, stand, and everything I need for $40.



#5 YouSillyHumans

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Posted 17 February 2014 - 12:39 AM

If you can't get the 75g in 1-2 months, I would rehome him. Look on craigslist for a used tank, us in the US find alot of good deals there.

 

I thought I couldnt get a tank for a while, as the initial setup would be about $300, but I looked on craigslist and got a full fishtank, stand, and everything I need for $40.

 

I could do fine with two months and buy the tank within this time if we are all still in agreement that it would be OK for the fish?

 

 

Thanks for the help so far.


Edited by YouSillyHumans, 17 February 2014 - 12:45 AM.


#6 sawickib

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Posted 17 February 2014 - 12:42 AM

You actually wouldnt need to cycle the tank as long as when you move him over you switch the filter media over as well and dont add any fish for a while. (if you plan on doing so)

#7 YouSillyHumans

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Posted 17 February 2014 - 12:53 AM

You actually wouldnt need to cycle the tank as long as when you move him over you switch the filter media over as well and dont add any fish for a while. (if you plan on doing so)

Do you agree with fishaholic Elliie's/my proposal of two months being within safe limits for the baby eel?

 

 

Also thanks for the tip I will remember it.


Edited by YouSillyHumans, 17 February 2014 - 12:56 AM.


#8 sawickib

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Posted 17 February 2014 - 12:56 AM

Actually didnt look up the fish, now i did isnt he saltwater? But yea i would say if hes 7" he will be fine for 1-2 months not much longer though. Make sure your lid has no holes big enough for him to get out.

#9 YouSillyHumans

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Posted 17 February 2014 - 01:02 AM

Actually didnt look up the fish, now i did isnt he saltwater? But yea i would say if hes 7" he will be fine for 1-2 months not much longer though. Make sure your lid has no holes big enough for him to get out.

Yup he is salt water, He is my first eel and I have no first hand experience with this fish so I'm keeping the salinity at 1.023 which was recommended to me by the supplier.

 

I appreciate the help from both of you and even though I understand threads such as these ( how long can i keep a big fish in a small tank ) are not highly favorable but with this information I will be able to gather enough funds within the time period given and I'm sure he will appreciate the extra 20 gallons. As I know I will.

 

 

Of course as always I will continue to look for any red flags or signs of stress. 


Edited by YouSillyHumans, 17 February 2014 - 01:03 AM.


#10 sawickib

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Posted 17 February 2014 - 01:06 AM

WOAH then nvm disregard what i said about the filter media i have no experience with saltwater sorry dude. :/

#11 Donya

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Posted 17 February 2014 - 01:32 AM

I have moved this thread over to the saltwater section.

 

Generally it is a bad idea to get a fish that you know you are unequipped to keep long-term. Too often people think they will have an upgrade in a month or two and then that goes down the tube when something else in life comes up. Also, be aware that by the time a marine fish is showing overt signs of stress, it means you've waited too long to address the environmental issues. You risk a serious uphill battle with its health if the stress manifests as a weakened immune system and infections set in.

 

The biggest issue with even a small fish of this sort in a small tank is waste accumulation since predator tanks are messy. That's one of the reasons the volume needs to be so big for long-term care. How is the tank being filtered currently? Are you using live rock, and have you been keeping an eye on params?



#12 YouSillyHumans

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Posted 17 February 2014 - 07:28 PM

I have moved this thread over to the saltwater section.

 

Generally it is a bad idea to get a fish that you know you are unequipped to keep long-term. Too often people think they will have an upgrade in a month or two and then that goes down the tube when something else in life comes up. Also, be aware that by the time a marine fish is showing overt signs of stress, it means you've waited too long to address the environmental issues. You risk a serious uphill battle with its health if the stress manifests as a weakened immune system and infections set in.

 

The biggest issue with even a small fish of this sort in a small tank is waste accumulation since predator tanks are messy. That's one of the reasons the volume needs to be so big for long-term care. How is the tank being filtered currently? Are you using live rock, and have you been keeping an eye on params?

 

 

Yes I've been keeping an eye of the parameters, no signs of stress, and good appetite. The filter is a standard bio filter and a good power head is also in the tank.






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