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Tropical fish that dont need a heater


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#1 lola_goldie

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Posted 06 March 2003 - 08:24 AM

hey guys...
i know that betta's and guppies dont HAVE to be kept in heated water, but i was wondering how many other sorts of freshwater tropical fish can be.
im thinking a putting together a non-heated freshwater tropical fishtank for my son & daughters classroom at school, and i think i need a little more variety than a betta and a few guppies!

thankyou thankyou!

#2 Gabe

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Posted 06 March 2003 - 03:06 PM

Well, I have Black Skirt Tetras and don't have a heater. They do great with room temp water. I think a lot of the Tetras are ok with room temp water. I will be getting a heater to make sure it stays at room temp and I suggest you consider doing the same for the classroom tank. I'm not sure it the heat is turned down at night in schools.

#3 CFC

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Posted 06 March 2003 - 04:16 PM

There are loads of fish you can have without a heater,this is how my girlfriend and i got into fish keeping,here is a short list.

Zebra danios

rosy barbs

indian algea eaters

white cloud mountain minnows

peppered corydoras

Hongkong plecos

This list is by no means exhausted but all the fish should be easily obtainable and are suitable for a small community also none of the above will be affected by over night drops in temperature.Hope this has been of some help good luck and happy fish keeeping

#4 Very Fishy

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Posted 06 March 2003 - 07:10 PM

White Cloud Mountain Minnows are great little fish that would thrive in cool water. They are very hardy.

#5 lola_goldie

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Posted 06 March 2003 - 08:58 PM

well thanx alot everyone! :)

#6 Tropicalfishfn

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Posted 06 March 2003 - 11:01 PM

you can put guppies in cold water :huh: :huh:

#7 Minxnfella

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Posted 09 March 2003 - 12:32 AM

Isn't the idea of tropical fish that they are from tropical climes? White cloud minnows are usually sold as sub tropical though right? Mine are doing really well in with the goldfish but my room is exceptionally warm, their tank is reading 25 degrees C without a heater right now.

Just a thought

#8 lola_goldie

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Posted 09 March 2003 - 05:42 AM

it isnt set up yet...
but the climate here in australia really never gets very cold anyway
my golfish tanks are 24 degrees celsius at the moment...
and today is a pretty coolish day.

#9 tdnp

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Posted 09 March 2003 - 03:36 PM

two of my friends keep plecs in coldwater with koi carp

#10 lilmolly

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Posted 10 March 2003 - 09:19 PM

Well, before I knew nothing about mollies I kept mine in a 2.5 gal tank without heat for about a year. Same thing with guppies. I kept them in a warm room of the house though, Not the guppies.

#11 CFC

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Posted 26 March 2003 - 02:50 PM

Bought this one back to the top to save having to go through it all again :lol: :lol:

#12 fish503

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Posted 28 March 2003 - 08:40 PM

WHAT KIND OF LIGHTING DO U HAVE IF YOU HAVE INCANDESENT(SPELLING) YOU DONT NEED A HEATER CAUSE IT HEATS THE WATER AND YOU CAN GET ALL SORTS OF FISH BUT IF YOU HAVE FLORESENT(SPELLING) YOU ARE LIMITED TRY WHIT CLOUD MINNOWS

#13 Dragonslair

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Posted 29 March 2003 - 07:09 PM

It's basically to do with ambient temperatures. What you may classify as cold water in Australia may be quite tepid over here in the U.K. Tropical fish cannot survive in temp. below 19C. What happens is their metabolism shuts down and they slowly come to a stop until they die. The lower the temp. the slower and more sluggish their activity becomes, conversely the warmer the water the higher the rate in their metabolism and if the water is too high for too long they "burn" themselves out. So it's back to the basics of ambient temps.




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