Jump to content


Photo

African Clawed Frog?


  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 Fish Guy

Fish Guy

    Fish Crazy

  • Member
  • 367 posts

Posted 30 March 2011 - 11:47 AM

I was planning on getting an African Clawed Frog as my first break away from fish. I have done a good bit of research but have come across a few different temperatrue requirments for them. I was wondering if someone could tell me what they keep their ACF water temp. at? I always thought they were a cold water frog, aslways seeing them at the LFS in the goldfish tanks.

#2 MrCrabs

MrCrabs

    New Member

  • Member
  • 10 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 30 March 2011 - 01:01 PM

I was planning on getting an African Clawed Frog as my first break away from fish. I have done a good bit of research but have come across a few different temperatrue requirments for them. I was wondering if someone could tell me what they keep their ACF water temp. at? I always thought they were a cold water frog, aslways seeing them at the LFS in the goldfish tanks.




I keep mine at between 77 and 78 and he is always swimming around trying to catch a ghost shrimp (thus far failing) he eats sinking pellet and flake food that the fish let go.

#3 Fish Guy

Fish Guy

    Fish Crazy

  • Member
  • 367 posts

Posted 30 March 2011 - 02:08 PM

Ok, so I'm going to have to set up another tank just for the ACF in that case. I was planning on using my 30 gallon which I have large feeder gold fish in there. But if the water needs to be up in the 70's I'll have to set up the 10g perhaps. Though I have been doing some research I am still having a hard time finding anything on these guys. Do they like to have a cave/hiding place?

#4 Jenste

Jenste

    Resurrecting the Passion of Fishkeeping

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 2,163 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:United States

Posted 30 March 2011 - 09:24 PM

For ACF it is a very easy set up -

* 10 gallons for one frog
* no gravel substrate - smooth rocks that can't be eaten or sand
* live or silk plants, not plastic because it will tear the webbing between their toes. For a very easy live plant, I recommend live Water Wisteria - it is currently in every single one of my tanks including my froglet tank. I leave it floating and it grows like crazy. It makes a perfect buffer against lighting to keep the frog from getting stressed, and the frogs seem to enjoy resting in it at the water's surface when they go up to breathe.
* hiding places are a must - these frogs do not like overly bright lights (they have no eye lids) and a frog that knows it has a safe place to retreat to feels braver exploring its tank
* 78* F is good for a juvenile (under a year) due to their faster metabolism for growing. an adult should be kept around 73*F.
* because you are a new owner, do not keep with any type of fish (besides a 30 gallon with multiple goldfish would be overstocked)
* diet - - nothing freeze dried, no fish flakes, and do not feed "feeder fish" (feeder fish are kept in very poor conditions and are most often diseased - it is not worth risking your frogs' health for a cheap and un-nutritional snack). Best diet is HBH frog and tadpole bites for young frogs/ Reptomin sticks for adults. Treat with bait-store purchased earthworms (do not use worms from your garden because there is no way of knowing what fertilizers or pesticides they could have come in contact with), frozen bloodworms are also a favorite treat. Do not feed beef heart - it is exceptionally fatty.
* KEEP THE LID ON! these frogs are escape artists and can get out of even small openings - a mesh screen top (what would use for a reptile tank) is best.
* internal filter - an Elite stingray rated up to 15 gallons is a perfect size for the 10 gallon tank, and you can adjust the output to direct it at a back corner to minimize water disturbance.
* lighting - minimal. The need a day/night cycle - make sure the tank is in a room that becomes dark at night. With out eye lids, a constantly bright room can be stressful to them.

#5 Fish Guy

Fish Guy

    Fish Crazy

  • Member
  • 367 posts

Posted 31 March 2011 - 03:22 PM

Thank you very much for the info. I was also wondering how to determine from African Clawed and African Dwarf frogs? I have read that people have thought they purchased a dwarf but turned out to be a clawed. I am more interested in the molted/darker clawed frogs verus the albino. The albinos are easy to get here it seems, but not so much with the darker ones. But also there are lots of Dwarfs sold here too so I was wondering if they could actually be ACF.

#6 Jenste

Jenste

    Resurrecting the Passion of Fishkeeping

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 2,163 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:United States

Posted 01 April 2011 - 12:38 PM

Thank you very much for the info. I was also wondering how to determine from African Clawed and African Dwarf frogs? I have read that people have thought they purchased a dwarf but turned out to be a clawed. I am more interested in the molted/darker clawed frogs verus the albino. The albinos are easy to get here it seems, but not so much with the darker ones. But also there are lots of Dwarfs sold here too so I was wondering if they could actually be ACF.


I have a link in my signature about how to tell the difference but I can sum it up easily


1) webbing
* ACF have webbing between the toes on the hind legs and no webbing between the fingers on their hands.
* ADF have webbing between the toes on the hind legs AND webbing between the fingers on their hands.

2) eyes
* ACF have eyes that are perched on top of their head
* ADF have eyes that are flush against the sides of their faces

3) color
* for now, only ACF are available in albino forms in fish stores. there have been a few albino dwarfs popping up but it is a rarity in the private breeding sector and not yet a controlled gene like albinism in ACF.

steps 1 & 2 are the best way for you to identify, with 1 being by far the easiest! *always check the hands and do not listen to pet store employees!*

#7 miatiny

miatiny

    New Member

  • Member
  • 46 posts

Posted 02 April 2011 - 01:03 PM

You can feed them male crickets(without the female egg laying part) and krill as well. Mine loved hunting the crickets:) Much easier to catch them the ghost shrimp.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users