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Trying To Make Albino Mollies


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#1 clay

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Posted 15 December 2008 - 11:48 PM

for a while now i have been trying to make albino sailfin/mexican molly hybrids.i have ended up so far with a realy cool looking male sailfinish looking male he is silver with orange dots all over him.this actually suprises me because both of the parents were marbled or almost solid black.lol.
any help with the genetic traits that might make the babies albino?

#2 LauraFrog

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Posted 16 December 2008 - 12:45 AM

Albinism is a distinct genetic trait in itself. You won't achieve true albino (solid white, pink eyes) breeding anything else. TBH I've never heard of an albino molly and in some species, the albino gene is actually fatal.

If you just want white, breeding together silvers with less and less markings will eventually result in a pure and attractive white colour, but you will still get throwbacks for the first few generations after the white is achieved - ones with black or grey flecks etc. Cull them out as soon as the markings become apparent. Give them away or raise them separately to be sold.

To breed true albino, you would need to find at least one specimen that was already albino, but you could establish a line from a single albino fish - you just need to find an albino fish! Here's what you do assuming that the gene for albinism is recessive.

ALBINO FISH - aa
Breed with REGULAR FISH - AA.
All resulting offspring are Aa - that is, they show colour but carry the recessive gene for albinism.

Then breed BROTHER AND SISTER from first cross with the albino fish.
Resulting in: 25% AA, no albinism. 50% Aa, carriers. These two will be indistinguishable. Cull. You will also get 25% aa, albino. Those are the ones you keep working with to establish a strain. Once you have the colour breeding true, look for other aspects. Remove the ones that are sickly, weak or grow slowly, and breed only from the ones with good finnage and form as well as the colour.

Good luck finding an albino molly!

#3 helterskelter

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Posted 16 December 2008 - 06:32 AM

Their are loads if albino's already out their.

Seen 100's on golden sailfins with the albino trate's
and if u find chocolate mollies these are also albino's.

LauraFrog is correct though with genetic's.

If you do get an albino then best thing to do if breed it back with the parents.
ie. If you get a male albino you want to idearly breed it back to the mum (seperate her for 6-8 months till she stop producing fry then breed).
Or Breed him back with his sisters, as not all the sister will carry the Aa gene (normal looking but with albino gene) you need to keep each female on her own and raise each batch of fry untill you find a female that dose produce albino's then once you get several albino you then that an aa gene pool to hopefully work with.

#4 LauraFrog

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Posted 16 December 2008 - 07:37 AM

Yeah, but if you get one full albino, if you breed with a normal colour molly won't ALL the F1 be Aa?

Where are these albino mollies? I didn't know that chocolates were albino carriers... not that it makes any difference cause I can't get them. Waaah! lol

#5 helterskelter

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Posted 16 December 2008 - 05:15 PM

Depends, this is why you cross it back either with the parents or siblings.

As these have a much higher change of being Aa. Especially the parents.

Chocolates are a strange fish their albino as they have red eye's However they have a dark brown pigment which is very strange as albino's usualy have no black pigment.
You can see they have other pigment cells that are active as u look at the golden mollies and the red eye red swordtails.

Pic's of golden molly
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Longfin cochlate chip

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#6 clay

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Posted 17 December 2008 - 08:15 PM

Depends, this is why you cross it back either with the parents or siblings.

As these have a much higher change of being Aa. Especially the parents.

Chocolates are a strange fish their albino as they have red eye's However they have a dark brown pigment which is very strange as albino's usualy have no black pigment.
You can see they have other pigment cells that are active as u look at the golden mollies and the red eye red swordtails.

Pic's of golden molly
Posted Image

Posted Image

Longfin cochlate chip

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good pics. the first ones are the one im trying to achieve.

#7 LauraFrog

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Posted 17 December 2008 - 11:40 PM

This is interesting... I wonder if it would be possible to entirely eliminate pigmentation from the 'golden' mollies? I wonder what you'd get crossing them with silver (white)? They certainly carry something that must be recognised as an albino gene because of the pink eyes.

I wonder if it works a bit like horse coats. The three main horse colour streams (although there are others) are chestnut, bay and black. There are two dilution genes in play with horses. A foal that inherits one of them is palomino (base chestnut), buckskin (base bay) or grey/white (base black). A foal that inherits both - cremello (base chestnut), perlino (base bay) or smokey cream (base black) is a double dilute. It often has pink or 'wall' (blue) eyes. The colour is so faint that it's practically white, usually a cleaner white than 'white' horses who are born black or grey and have only a single dilution gene. I wonder if what we're seeing with the chocolate chip and golden mollies is a single albino or dilution gene, and it may be possible to double it, achieving a true albino. (In horses, there is no true albino. The 'true' albino gene is fatal with foals aborting, being stillborn or dying within a few days of birth.)




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