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African Dwarf Frogs


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#1 orandalove

orandalove

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Posted 17 August 2008 - 02:55 PM

I went to the fish store and bought two african dwarf frogs.
I figured out that one was male, and one was female.

Before I bought them, I had read online about african dwarf frog mating.

So anyway, i was just sitting, watching them, until i saw them do this position:

http://members.cox.n.../amplecting.jpg

That is the position that african dwarf frogs do when mating, but this only lasted for a couple of seconds with my frogs.

A few questions:

Tell me, was this mating session complete, or was it not?

How can i tell if my female frog is pregnant or not?

How long does it take for a female frog to lay eggs after mating?

And for the last one, what should i do with the eggs if i wake up to them one morning? :crazy:

#2 pillbugalug

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Posted 02 October 2008 - 04:57 AM

I went to the fish store and bought two african dwarf frogs.
I figured out that one was male, and one was female.

Before I bought them, I had read online about african dwarf frog mating.

So anyway, i was just sitting, watching them, until i saw them do this position:

http://members.cox.n.../amplecting.jpg

That is the position that african dwarf frogs do when mating, but this only lasted for a couple of seconds with my frogs.

A few questions:

Tell me, was this mating session complete, or was it not?

How can i tell if my female frog is pregnant or not?

How long does it take for a female frog to lay eggs after mating?

And for the last one, what should i do with the eggs if i wake up to them one morning? :crazy:



#3 pillbugalug

pillbugalug

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Posted 02 October 2008 - 05:12 AM

It sounds like your African Dwarf frogs did not mate. Over the years I have seen my frogs go through the whole courtship process, mate, lay eggs, produce tadpoles. First of all, the mating process takes hours - usually they start late at night and stay in embrace through early morning. The female will swim loops, with the male riding along, and each time she passes (upside down) by the surface of the water she will lay some eggs. The eggs look like black dots, big enough to see without a lens. If you do wake up sometime to find eggs in the tank and you really want to try to keep them then you must separate the eggs from the parents because the frogs, including the parents (once the parents are done mating) will eat the eggs. Other frogs and fish in your tank will eat the eggs as they are layed! First they will eat the ones floating at the top of the water. Then they will find the ones that are sticking to the plants. I think the gentlest way to rescue the delicate eggs is to scoop the eggs floating at the surface along with some water in a container. Then you can remove them to their own tank, or to a nursery that floats within the parent tank. After a couple of days the tadpoles will hatch and then your job becomes difficult - they need frequent feedings of microscopic creatures such as protozoans and then as they get a little bigger - after day 5 or so - just hatched daphnia. Also be sure the tadpoles are in heated and aerated water. The frogs will also eat the tadpoles. One way to get your frogs in the mood is to raise the temperature of the water slightly. I keep about 10 frogs (and nothing else) in a twenty gallon tank and this has always resulted in mating. Course in Spring time they seem to really get into it anyway. I also keep the tank clean through water changes only - the frogs seem to prefer calm water and the outflow of the filter seemed to provoke the male frogs to do constant battle with the water to the point I was afraid they would exhaust themselves to death! I like the stillness of just the tank, rocks and plants too. I call them my Zen frogs.




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