Jump to content


Photo

Fish-in Cycling


  • Please log in to reply
134 replies to this topic

#1 rabbut

rabbut

    I don't bite, all that often...

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,923 posts

Posted 27 December 2007 - 10:29 PM

Fish in cycling, a beginner’s guide.

This is the process of cycling a tank using fish. Most people on the forum advise against this, but since so many of us fall into the trap of purchasing fish a few days after setting up the tank on their LFS’s advise, I thought I would write this guide. If you have not yet added any fish, I would strongly advise you to look at this thread, here to fishless cycle your tank. This is far more humane for you fish.

What is cycling?

This is the process of building up a colony of filter bacteria, to break down your fishes waste. Your filter will not function correctly until the cycle has finished, and unless care is taken, your fish may get poisoned to death as a result :sad: It is important to maintain this colony of bacteria at all times, as your fishes health depends upon a correctly working filter. Please read-up on filter media, here and also general maintenance, here
In a cycled tank, ammonia from fish waste is broken down into nitrite, by one set of bacteria. Another type of bacteria then breaks down nitrite into nitrate, the usual bi-product of your filters.

The term “Cycling” came about, as this is the process of establishing the nitrogen cycle in your aquarium. Fish produce waste. Some in the form of ammonia and other waste in other forms, which are converted to ammonia. There is one set of bacteria that break ammonia down into nitrite. Then another set of bacteria break this down into nitrate. In nature another set of bacteria would break nitrate down into nitrogen gas, and oxygen. This does sometimes occur in the aquarium, but filters are designed to stop this. This is because the by-product of the nitrate breakdown phase is Hydrogen Sulphide, which is also toxic. If enough Hydrogen Sulphide gets released, it can crash a tank (indirectly) by removing all the Oxygen from the water. This is why a tank ideally only contains bacteria to break down ammonia and nitrite. :good:

How to cycle with fish in your tank

As above, we are trying to build up a colony of bacteria, to remove your fish’s waste. To do this with fish in the tank, however, we will be exposing them to poisons, mainly ammonia and nitrite (note spelling), which will eventually be converted into nitrate, the by-product of your filter. It is important for your fish’s health, that the ammonia and nitrite levels remain low. These two chemicals are dangerous long-term at any level detectable, but start showing short-term damage above 0.25mg/l, or 0.25ppm. Invest in a test kit, to monitor these readings. Nitrate is also toxic in large amounts. 50ppm should be the highest you allow nitrate to go, but fish will adapt to values up to 100ppm. Liquid drop tests are the most accurate, and dip strips are notoriously inaccurate. I use the Tetra range of test kits, but many on here recommend API. An API master kit will cost around £25, and Tetra are more expensive. API is not available to me however, and this is why I use Tetra.
To keep the ammonia and nitrite at an acceptable level, we must water test at least twice a day, and carry out 50% water changes as appropriate, i.e. if any reading for ammonia or nitrite comes out above 0.25. Testing needs to be done regularly, as conditions in a cycling tank change quickly. It isn't uncommon to go from ammonia only, into a phase where ammonia is undetectable, and nitrite is through the roof with this type of cycling. To keep our fish alive, we must monitor values of ammonia and nitrite carefully, or we may seriously damage our new pets. All water added to a tank must be de-chlorinated, or the new water may kill either the fish or the filter media’s bacteria. Tap water conditioner is used for de-chlorinating new water. There are many brands out there, mostly doing the same job. Check they remove chlorine, chloramines and heavy metals.
A pH below 6 will dramatically slow the cycle. If it drops below this, carry out a water change. pH is a measure of how acid or alkaline water is, and is held stable by minerals dissolved in your water. A stable pH is more important than one in the ideal range, unless your pH repeatedly drops below 6. If the pH repeatedly drops, you are short of minerals in your tap water. You can add coral sand or coral gravel to the filter or substrate to up the hardness of your water, and raise the pH. This will hold the pH stable at this new value, unlike many other chemicals. Make sure you add this slowly, until the pH reaches 7. Adding too fast will stress your fish.
Once levels for ammonia and nitrite have been 0 and nitrate has been rising, you are cycled for that fish load, and you are ready for a few more fish, space allowing. Remember never to add enough fish to double the numbers in a 24 hour time period. This is because it will take time for the existing bacteria to multiply sufficiently to allow for the increased load. Always test the water before adding fish, and also test around 12hours after, to ensure all levels are at a safe value. Check all levels daily for a week after adding fish, to ensure the filters are still coping :good: Once cycled, and all levels for ammonia and nitrite are nil for a week, and nitrate is steadily rising, get yourself into the usual weekly maintenance routine, as described in the articles linked above.

Any suggestions for improvement welcome
Rabbut


Edited by eaglesaquarium, 17 July 2013 - 06:43 PM.


#2 radioman

radioman

    Fish Crazy

  • Member
  • 354 posts

Posted 27 December 2007 - 11:19 PM

I think this is helpful for those who do not want to return fish.

#3 rabbut

rabbut

    I don't bite, all that often...

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,923 posts

Posted 28 December 2007 - 09:31 PM

I think this is helpful for those who do not want to return fish.


glad to hear you approve. Any points for improvement anyone?

All the best
Rabbut

#4 dthoffsett

dthoffsett

    I'm a girl . . . yup, definitely a girl. =)

  • Retired Moderator
  • 4,730 posts
  • Gender:Female

Posted 02 January 2008 - 03:11 AM

Once cycled, and all levels are nil for a week, get yourself into the usual weekly maintenance routine, as described in the articles linked above.


Just thought I'd point out that unless you have live plants or are using RO water, there will almost always be a detectable level of nitrate.

Other than that, sound pretty good. :good:

#5 rabbut

rabbut

    I don't bite, all that often...

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,923 posts

Posted 02 January 2008 - 09:35 PM

Once cycled, and all levels are nil for a week, get yourself into the usual weekly maintenance routine, as described in the articles linked above.


Just thought I'd point out that unless you have live plants or are using RO water, there will almost always be a detectable level of nitrate.

Other than that, sound pretty good. :good:


Thanks for that, a little oversight on my part :blush: Will rectify :good:

All the best
Rabbut

#6 Tobigara

Tobigara

    Fishaholic

  • Member
  • 532 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 03 January 2008 - 07:29 PM

i can't think of anything else to add. well done, rabbut! :good: how do we get this pinned?

#7 rabbut

rabbut

    I don't bite, all that often...

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,923 posts

Posted 03 January 2008 - 08:33 PM

i can't think of anything else to add. well done, rabbut! :good: how do we get this pinned?


Thanks Tobigara. I was just writing this to save me some time typing out multiple times in cycling topics, but if you recon its pinworthy, then feel free to recomend it :good:

Rabbut

#8 backtotropical

backtotropical

    Retired Mod

  • Retired Moderator
  • 4,477 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling

Posted 04 January 2008 - 01:00 AM

Good thread Rabbut, and i'm all for pinning it. A good fish-in cycling guide is definitely something that the forum really needs.

If i may suggest, i think mentioning ammonium is unnecessary and confusing. As the ratio of ammonia to ammonium depends on PH and temperature, and ammonium is actually not toxic to fish (at least not in the levels found in our tanks), i would suggest that keeping it simple is the key (as this thread is really aimed at new hobbyists) and that only ammonia, nitrite and nitrate need be mentioned in this respect. In addition to this you give a good indication of what the desirable readings are for ammonia and nitrite, but not nitrate.

You state that all tank water should be dechlorinated, but do not elaborate on how to do this. (Beginners may not know)

You briefly mention PH, but kind of skim over the issue. I would suggest that you should include a section to relay the importance of a stable PH and how to achieve this.

Also you mention test kits, but do not recommend a test kit for nitrate. I suggest that tests for ammonia, nitrite, nitrate and PH are useful/necessary for the beginner.

Sorry if this seems picky, i'm trying to imagine i don't know anything about the hobby and what i might need.

Good work, i'm going to recommend pinning if nobody else has. :good:

BTT

#9 rabbut

rabbut

    I don't bite, all that often...

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,923 posts

Posted 04 January 2008 - 06:08 PM

Good thread Rabbut, and i'm all for pinning it. A good fish-in cycling guide is definitely something that the forum really needs.

If i may suggest, i think mentioning ammonium is unnecessary and confusing. As the ratio of ammonia to ammonium depends on PH and temperature, and ammonium is actually not toxic to fish (at least not in the levels found in our tanks), i would suggest that keeping it simple is the key (as this thread is really aimed at new hobbyists) and that only ammonia, nitrite and nitrate need be mentioned in this respect. In addition to this you give a good indication of what the desirable readings are for ammonia and nitrite, but not nitrate.

You state that all tank water should be dechlorinated, but do not elaborate on how to do this. (Beginners may not know)

You briefly mention PH, but kind of skim over the issue. I would suggest that you should include a section to relay the importance of a stable PH and how to achieve this.

Also you mention test kits, but do not recommend a test kit for nitrate. I suggest that tests for ammonia, nitrite, nitrate and PH are useful/necessary for the beginner.

Sorry if this seems picky, i'm trying to imagine i don't know anything about the hobby and what i might need.

Good work, i'm going to recommend pinning if nobody else has. :good:

BTT


Thanks BTT. Its been a while since I was a beginner, so I forget that things that seem obvious to us more experienced members, is not always so when you are starting out. I will modify the first post appropriately, having taken your words of advise onboard :good:

All the best
Rabbut

#10 andywg

andywg

    Bored into leaving

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,350 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 04 January 2008 - 06:45 PM

Should there really be a section on pH? I know it is easier to tell people about it, but the science found by bignose indicates that pH swings are not a problem for fish, but hardness swings are.

I don't think we really want to go myth debunking in a guide, but do we want to give out potentially incorrect information?

Perhaps if you state that tanks with a stable pH and other parameters do better, or something?

/me is unsure of how to remedy this.

#11 rabbut

rabbut

    I don't bite, all that often...

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,923 posts

Posted 04 January 2008 - 07:00 PM

Should there really be a section on pH? I know it is easier to tell people about it, but the science found by bignose indicates that pH swings are not a problem for fish, but hardness swings are.

I don't think we really want to go myth debunking in a guide, but do we want to give out potentially incorrect information?

Perhaps if you state that tanks with a stable pH and other parameters do better, or something?

/me is unsure of how to remedy this.


A valid point andywg. I assume you are refuring to bignoses post about aclimation here? If so, wasn't his research indicating that changes in hardness could effect the ability of the fish to remove toxins form their body, while they adjusted to the new conditions? If this is so, then it probibly would be best to state that stability is more important, and indicate that if the pH crashes, it is best to do a waterchange, but adding the new water over a period of time, rather than in one go? Presumably there would be a significan difference in KH if the pH has crashed, to the new water being added?

All the best
Rabbut

Edited by rabbut, 04 January 2008 - 07:02 PM.


#12 rabbut

rabbut

    I don't bite, all that often...

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,923 posts

Posted 06 January 2008 - 04:26 PM

Anyone? Members who have just read this, did you find it easy enough to understand?

All the best
Rabbut

#13 backtotropical

backtotropical

    Retired Mod

  • Retired Moderator
  • 4,477 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling

Posted 06 January 2008 - 07:40 PM

It is important for your fish’s health, that the ammonia and nitrite levels remain low. These three?? chemicals are dangerous long-term at any level detectable, but start showing short-term damage above 0.25mg/l, or 0.25ppm.


Spot the mistake........................................

It's reading much better Rabbut. I don't know if i would recommend using powder buffers to beginners though. I think that's asking for trouble. I would rather recommend that a handful of coral sand or coral gravel is mixed into the substrate as appropriate, as this would hold the conditions of the tank more stable than powder based solutions which need to be added regularly.

Cheers

BTT

#14 backtotropical

backtotropical

    Retired Mod

  • Retired Moderator
  • 4,477 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling

Posted 06 January 2008 - 07:46 PM

I use the Tetra range of test kits, but may on here recommend API.


Just spotted this too. I think this should read 'many'.

:good:

#15 rabbut

rabbut

    I don't bite, all that often...

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,923 posts

Posted 06 January 2008 - 08:44 PM

I use the Tetra range of test kits, but may on here recommend API.


Just spotted this too. I think this should read 'many'.

:good:


woops :blush: thanks btt

It is important for your fish’s health, that the ammonia and nitrite levels remain low. These three?? chemicals are dangerous long-term at any level detectable, but start showing short-term damage above 0.25mg/l, or 0.25ppm.


Spot the mistake........................................

It's reading much better Rabbut. I don't know if i would recommend using powder buffers to beginners though. I think that's asking for trouble. I would rather recommend that a handful of coral sand or coral gravel is mixed into the substrate as appropriate, as this would hold the conditions of the tank more stable than powder based solutions which need to be added regularly.

Cheers

BTT



Another good point btt. I forget how quickly these powdered buffers swing the pH too, so have heeded your advise and changed the bit about raising hardness accordingly :good:

All the best
Rabbut

#16 andywg

andywg

    Bored into leaving

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,350 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 07 January 2008 - 01:05 AM

Others will not recommend API, such as myself who found the tests to be as accurate as asking Uri Gellar to think of a number while bending spoons, especially their nitrate kit.

#17 rabbut

rabbut

    I don't bite, all that often...

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,923 posts

Posted 07 January 2008 - 03:09 PM

Anyone else question the accuracy of the API tests, like andy? I must admit that his are the first negative opinions I have heard of the kit, and I can't comment on them myself, as I have never realy used them. I add the API kit into the origional post, as this is the one I see most members recomending to others. Are they not as good as they should be? If not they will be removed.

All the best
Rabbut

#18 bucksgill

bucksgill

    Fish Fanatic

  • Member
  • 135 posts

Posted 07 January 2008 - 04:19 PM

Nice info

#19 P&J

P&J

    Fish Fanatic

  • Member
  • 160 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 08 January 2008 - 12:48 AM

Great thread Rabbut. You were helping me treat for ich while cycling in another thread, but I also found this one helpful.

My only suggestion would be to elaborate a bit where you suggest testing twice a day and changing the water as appropriate. Very good advice, but for a true beginner there isn't any info about what to expect while the cycle progresses.

For example: While I was cycling (still am), I was testing frequently in the beginning and getting the same results almost every time: both ammonia and nitrite would rise. I kept doing 50% water changes to get it back down, only to see them come right back up. Then today, suddenly, in less than a 24 hour period, my nitrites shot through the roof (I had been seeing about a doubling, this was more like a quadrupling or more) and the ammonia actually dropped on its own (no water change). Unfortunately, I was at work and lost one of my platies. :( The other was struggling, and I actually thought I lost him while changing the water, but he perked up again after the change. (The ich still won't leave!)

I suppose my point is that beginners need to be aware that the levels can change fast. Also, I don't think it was clearly stated in the post that ammonia is converted into nitrite. A zero reading of nitrite could mean that you simply don't have bacteria yet, and you need to watch out for a sudden increase.

-P

Edited by P&J, 08 January 2008 - 12:49 AM.


#20 Tobigara

Tobigara

    Fishaholic

  • Member
  • 532 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 08 January 2008 - 04:00 PM

i found nothing wrong with this post but as i read the suggestions of others i realized that BTT was right. I'm not looking at this like a beginner. :blush: i still think this is a great thread tho and it should be pinned.

hey rabbut what are the chances of resubmitting this as a finished product when all the bases have been covered? i'd be glad to help.

#21 rabbut

rabbut

    I don't bite, all that often...

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,923 posts

Posted 08 January 2008 - 11:23 PM

Great thread Rabbut. You were helping me treat for ich while cycling in another thread, but I also found this one helpful.

My only suggestion would be to elaborate a bit where you suggest testing twice a day and changing the water as appropriate. Very good advice, but for a true beginner there isn't any info about what to expect while the cycle progresses.

For example: While I was cycling (still am), I was testing frequently in the beginning and getting the same results almost every time: both ammonia and nitrite would rise. I kept doing 50% water changes to get it back down, only to see them come right back up. Then today, suddenly, in less than a 24 hour period, my nitrites shot through the roof (I had been seeing about a doubling, this was more like a quadrupling or more) and the ammonia actually dropped on its own (no water change). Unfortunately, I was at work and lost one of my platies. :( The other was struggling, and I actually thought I lost him while changing the water, but he perked up again after the change. (The ich still won't leave!)

I suppose my point is that beginners need to be aware that the levels can change fast. Also, I don't think it was clearly stated in the post that ammonia is converted into nitrite. A zero reading of nitrite could mean that you simply don't have bacteria yet, and you need to watch out for a sudden increase.

-P


OK, will modify tomorrow, as don't have time now, to reflect how you found it. I will attempt to clarify it a bit.

i found nothing wrong with this post but as i read the suggestions of others i realized that BTT was right. I'm not looking at this like a beginner. :blush: i still think this is a great thread tho and it should be pinned.

hey rabbut what are the chances of resubmitting this as a finished product when all the bases have been covered? i'd be glad to help.


I guess that I could repost this once complete, but TBH don't reli see the point, as it is good to re-read the feedback if changes are requested, to see if they conflict with past improvements e.c.t

Thanks for your help
Rabbut

#22 eb2

eb2

    Fish Crazy

  • Member
  • 219 posts

Posted 09 January 2008 - 12:47 AM

[quote name='rabbut' date='Jan 6 2008, 10:26 AM' post='1865370']
Anyone? Members who have just read this, did you find it easy enough to understand?

All the best
Rabbut

newish to hobby and this is my first post ever, yes easy to understand. I will likely try this method for my next tank. I have have 2 tanks now. I did my 1st tank wrong for starters but was turned on to the Biospira right away before any damage was done, and that worked for me. I just started a 2nd tank about 10 days ago, it was a Betta bowl (2.5 gal) and the fish got sick right away so I switched to a 3 gal biowheel setup. I've done frequent water changes due to the medication. Today was the last day of medication, so I will be putting the carbon into the filter and I may put Biospira in this tank too, now that meds have stopped but I'm wondering if should try to let the tank cycle without it? (The guys at the LFS stores around here all like the product and I have 4 fish specialty stores within 10 miles of me) I have all the tests on hand.

#23 Bauchingera

Bauchingera

    New Member

  • Member
  • 15 posts

Posted 09 January 2008 - 06:15 AM

I did a fish in cycle, and the guy at the LFS said that i could put my fish in my tank a few hours after adding water if i added water conditioner and a product called cycle to the water and i did...the fish were fine and they were swimming around normaly.

but next tank i think i will do a fishless cycle...

#24 rabbut

rabbut

    I don't bite, all that often...

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,923 posts

Posted 10 January 2008 - 04:51 PM

I did my 1st tank wrong for starters but was turned on to the Biospira right away before any damage was done, and that worked for me.


Biospira is one of the few "bactiria in the bottle" products that work, assuming that it has been stored correctly. Always check that the product has been refigerated.

I just started a 2nd tank about 10 days ago, it was a Betta bowl (2.5 gal) and the fish got sick right away so I switched to a 3 gal biowheel setup. I've done frequent water changes due to the medication. Today was the last day of medication, so I will be putting the carbon into the filter and I may put Biospira in this tank too, now that meds have stopped but I'm wondering if should try to let the tank cycle without it?


I would move some mature media across from the tank(s) you already have cycled, so that you don't have to buy biospira, and mature media is also more likely to still be biologicaly active once added to the tank :good:

(The guys at the LFS stores around here all like the product and I have 4 fish specialty stores within 10 miles of me) I have all the tests on hand.


They sound better than most, acctualy recomending a product that does what it says, however none recomend a fishless cycle. This still leaves me questioning their advise. Next time you go in, ask them about fishless cycling, and see what they say about it, and also ask why they don't normaly advise it. See what they say....If it is a good answer (though I can't think of one off the top of my head) then you can trust them.

All the best
Rabbut

#25 eb2

eb2

    Fish Crazy

  • Member
  • 219 posts

Posted 11 January 2008 - 01:24 AM

I did my 1st tank wrong for starters but was turned on to the Biospira right away before any damage was done, and that worked for me.


Biospira is one of the few "bactiria in the bottle" products that work, assuming that it has been stored correctly. Always check that the product has been refigerated.

I just started a 2nd tank about 10 days ago, it was a Betta bowl (2.5 gal) and the fish got sick right away so I switched to a 3 gal biowheel setup. I've done frequent water changes due to the medication. Today was the last day of medication, so I will be putting the carbon into the filter and I may put Biospira in this tank too, now that meds have stopped but I'm wondering if should try to let the tank cycle without it?


I would move some mature media across from the tank(s) you already have cycled, so that you don't have to buy biospira, and mature media is also more likely to still be biologicaly active once added to the tank :good:

(The guys at the LFS stores around here all like the product and I have 4 fish specialty stores within 10 miles of me) I have all the tests on hand.


They sound better than most, acctualy recomending a product that does what it says, however none recomend a fishless cycle. This still leaves me questioning their advise. Next time you go in, ask them about fishless cycling, and see what they say about it, and also ask why they don't normaly advise it. See what they say....If it is a good answer (though I can't think of one off the top of my head) then you can trust them.

All the best
Rabbut


I'll definitely ask, as I am trying to educate myself and obviously both times the fish was already in and it was too late... I had media from my other tank in there already, I also had the Biospira on hand, so I added, and my levels spiked Way Up!! I changed that water to bring them down last night, and they were up again this morning, so I changed it again... this time conditioning with Amquel instead of Stress Coat, this brought the levels right to normal... and I wasn't going to be home all day to check. Also, poor fish may be getting tired of me messing with him...he doesn't mind the hose, comes when I feed but isn't really building bubble nests yet (as I he had a chance with that many water changes) would you have done anything different there? I want to put some of my live plants from the other tank in there, and a couple of more fish too but it has been soo unstable.

#26 rabbut

rabbut

    I don't bite, all that often...

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,923 posts

Posted 11 January 2008 - 04:57 PM

Also, poor fish may be getting tired of me messing with him...


He's under less stress than if you were to just leave him, so keep up for now...he'll soon forgive you :good:

but isn't really building bubble nests yet (as I he had a chance with that many water changes) would you have done anything different there?


I would surgest that he is a little too stressed ATM to be thinking about breeding, so again, on't worry about this. As soon as the ammonia and nitrite are back under contral, provided conditions are right, he'll start building again

I want to put some of my live plants from the other tank in there, and a couple of more fish too but it has been soo unstable.


Plants can be added at amy part of the cycle, as they actualy absorb ammonia and nitrite more readily than nitrate, thus may even help the situation. I agree though that things aren't suitable for more fish. Again, once all levels are back where thay should be, you are ready to add a few more. Remember to watch the stats after adding them though :good:

All the best
Rabbut

#27 rabbut

rabbut

    I don't bite, all that often...

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,923 posts

Posted 06 February 2008 - 07:48 PM

Nobodys posted improvements for a while, so presuably most are happy with it?

Is this a thread worth pinning? Mods? I ask as a few have asked for it to be pinned once modifications have been finished. I notice there isn't an easy-to-find guide for fish-in cycling on the forum ATM. I was wondering if one is worth while, as many newbies get stuck in a situation where they have to fish-in cycle, due to lfs advise.

Thanks all
Rabbut

#28 Larissa

Larissa

    Fish Crazy

  • Member
  • 333 posts

Posted 06 February 2008 - 08:15 PM

A few spelling and grammar issues:

“In a cycled tank, ammonia from fish waste is brocken down into nitrite, by one set of bacteria. Another type of bacteria then break down nitrite into nitrate, the usual bi-product of your filters.”

“Brocken” should be broken and…

“There are many brands out there, mostly doing the same job. Check they remove chlorine chloramines and heavy metals.”

There should be a comma between chlorine and chloramines.

Other than that all I can say is “PIN IT!” I have already made links to this post whilst giving advice to people doing fish-in cycles so it is definitely helpful.

#29 rabbut

rabbut

    I don't bite, all that often...

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,923 posts

Posted 06 February 2008 - 08:32 PM

A few spelling and grammar issues:

“In a cycled tank, ammonia from fish waste is brocken down into nitrite, by one set of bacteria. Another type of bacteria then break down nitrite into nitrate, the usual bi-product of your filters.”

“Brocken” should be broken and…

“There are many brands out there, mostly doing the same job. Check they remove chlorine chloramines and heavy metals.”

There should be a comma between chlorine and chloramines.

Other than that all I can say is “PIN IT!” I have already made links to this post whilst giving advice to people doing fish-in cycles so it is definitely helpful.

:blush:

Woops. I'll get that fixed :good:

Thanks for pointing that out

Rabbut

#30 littlest

littlest

    Fishaholic

  • Member
  • 590 posts

Posted 06 February 2008 - 11:21 PM

one little thing... I remember when I was a newbie I had no idea what the nitrogen cycle even was. While you explain the practical steps very well (and that is the most important bit after all), there's isn't much explanation of what happens in the nitrogen cycle (ie. fish waste = ammonia, converted by Bacteria1 to nitrite, which is onverted to bacteria 2 into nitrate). Probably not vital to explain, but I found it helpful to know where these chemicals are coming from. Maybe a little brief explaination in the "What is cycling" intro bit? literally a sentence or two.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users