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Molly Constipated?


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#1 xena

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Posted 25 January 2006 - 09:33 PM

Hey.. my cloudy water has gone, but Im wondering if my molly is constipated? What are the symptoms..
She looks a lil bloated, generally stays at bottom with stringy white? poo..
Also I have an angel that, i dont know if i am just looking for symptoms now, but appears to have slight reddish colour beneath her fins?
help as always is appreciated. :)

#2 WILDER

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Posted 25 January 2006 - 09:40 PM

White stringy poo can be a number of things ffrom constipation, internal bacteria infection, too internal parasites is the anus enlarge or red and inflamed, i would try some shelled peas and daphnia, but resting on the bottom could also indicate a bacterial infection, can she maintain her balance when she does swim, also are the scales sticking out, if they are red patches on the fins is sounds like septicemia.

Not the author of this information below.
Septicemia



Symptoms:

Fish may have reddening at fin bases, blood streaks throughout the fins and body, small hemorrhages around the eyes. Dull listless behavior and lack of appetite may also be present.



Cause:

Systemic bacterial infection caused by various bacteria, including Aeromonas, Pseudomonas and Vibrio. The illness is often brought on by poor water quality or as a result of parasitic infestations or other infections. These bacteria enter the blood stream and circulate through the tissues causing inflammation and damage. Inflamed blood vessels in the skin and at fin bases stand out. Blood vessel and heart tissue damage cause hemorrhaging and consequently leakage of body fluids into the abdomen, which may lead to Dropsy.



Treatment:

Water conditions must be improved for all fish in the tank, regardless of how many fish are infected. Check your water’s Treat with Kanacyn or Tetracycline as well as with a medicated food if the fish will eat. If parasites are suspected, all the fish in the tank should be treated with antiparasitic medication. Using salt to help restore osmotic balance might be helpful.

#3 xena

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Posted 25 January 2006 - 09:44 PM

no redness that I can see, she rarely moves around but when she does she seems a little bottom heavy like swimming at an angle or swims up and down, fins appear fine?
I have put plants in the tank and fed blood worm yesterday.
do canned peas work? or fresh raw ones? not sure on this

#4 WILDER

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Posted 25 January 2006 - 09:48 PM

Frozen peas are good, boil for a few minutes, let cool down, pop out of shell then squeeze between fingers and add the pea to the tank.
Left you information the angel fish with the red under it's fin as it sounds like septicemia.
And the one that you think is constipated sadly it sounds like swim bladder.

Not the writer of this information below.
Swim Bladder Disorder



The Swim bladder is a gas-filled sac located inside the fish’s body cavity just above most of the other internal organs. This sac is what gives the fish buoyancy and controls equilibrium. The amount of gas in this sac changes as the fish rises and sinks in the water, enabling it to swim, hover and move in the water. Without the use of the Swim-bladder organ a fish is unable to control it's own movements.



Symptoms:

Fish with a swim bladder disorder appear to have an abnormal swimming pattern, usually with their tail end up. They also appear to have difficulty maintaining equilibrium. They may even float upside down or appear to be stuck at the surface of the water, being unable to swim down, or they may lie on the bottom, unable to rise. Fish with a swim bladder disorder will continue to try and feed, showing a normal appetite.



Cause:

The most common cause of swim bladder disorders is improper diet. An improper diet can lead to intestinal gas or intestinal blockages. Intestinal blockages can irritate the bowel, giving bacteria or other parasites an entry point where they can then cause damage to the swim bladder. Swim bladder disorders are most common in the larger, deep-bodied varieties of Goldfish. Fish also fed a lot of dried foods, especially pellets, are most susceptible. This condition is frequently observed in the later stages of Malawi Bloat, which is primarily due to an improper diet as well and intestinal irritation.



Treatment:

Because this disorder is due principally to an improper diet, a change in their feeding needs to be made. Dried foods with lots of protein should be kept to a minimum. Pellets and other dense foods should be soaked prior to feeding or completely eliminated from their diet. Foods with lots of fiber should be introduced, such as zucchini, squash, spinach, romaine lettuce, peas, and grated carrots. If you suspect that the fish is victim to a bacterial infection, treat the fish with a medicated food.

Edited by Wilder, 25 January 2006 - 09:49 PM.


#5 xena

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Posted 25 January 2006 - 09:53 PM

hmm looked at that but it is not tail up, its head up? just at an angle.. might try and get some peas tomorrow.......
Not sure with the Angel, wont have chance to get to the shop until the weekend

My angel also appears to be eating and behaving fine?

#6 WILDER

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Posted 25 January 2006 - 09:53 PM

Good luck.




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